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Engineering serendipity: High-throughput discovery of materials that resist bacterial attachment

Magennis, E.P.; Hook, A.L.; Davies, M.C.; Alexander, C.; Williams, P.; Alexander, Morgan R.

Authors

E.P. Magennis

ANDREW HOOK ANDREW.HOOK@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Nottingham Research Fellow

M.C. Davies

PAUL WILLIAMS paul.williams@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Molecular Microbiology



Abstract

Controlling the colonisation of materials by microorganisms is important in a wide range of industries and clinical settings. To date, the underlying mechanisms that govern the interactions of bacteria with material surfaces remain poorly understood, limiting the ab initio design and engineering of biomaterials to control bacterial attachment. Combinatorial approaches involving high-throughput screening have emerged as key tools for identifying materials to control bacterial attachment. The hundreds of different materials assessed using these methods can be carried out with the aid of computational modelling. This approach can develop an understanding of the rules used to predict bacterial attachment to surfaces of non-toxic synthetic materials. Here we outline our view on the state of this field and the challenges and opportunities in this area for the coming years.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Apr 1, 2016
Journal Acta Biomaterialia
Print ISSN 1742-7061
Electronic ISSN 1878-7568
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 34
Pages 84-92
APA6 Citation Magennis, E., Hook, A., Davies, M., Alexander, C., Williams, P., & Alexander, M. R. (2016). Engineering serendipity: High-throughput discovery of materials that resist bacterial attachment. Acta Biomaterialia, 34, 84-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2015.11.008
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2015.11.008
Keywords Biomaterials, Bacteria, High-throughput, Biofilm, Polymers
Publisher URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1742706115301859
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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