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Motivation and willingness to increase physical activity for dementia risk reduction: Cross-Sectional UK survey with people aged 50 and over

Oliveira, Deborah; Knight, Holly; Jones, Katy A.; Ogollah, Reuben; Orrell, Martin

Motivation and willingness to increase physical activity for dementia risk reduction: Cross-Sectional UK survey with people aged 50 and over Thumbnail


Authors

Deborah Oliveira

KATY JONES Katy.Jones@nottingham.ac.uk
Assistant Professor in Applied Psychology

REUBEN OGOLLAH REUBEN.OGOLLAH@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Associate Professor of Medical Statistics and Clinical Trials

MARTIN ORRELL M.ORRELL@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Director - Institute of Mental Health



Abstract

Objective:Tackling modifiable risk factors such as physical inactivity currently represents the only way to reduce the increasing prevalence of dementia worldwide. This study aimed to investigate attitudes to increasing physical activity to reduce risk of dementia in people over 50. Methods: Attitudes to increasing physical activity to reduce risk of dementia were assessed in a national online survey promoted via online forums and public adverts. The Motivation to Change Behaviour for Dementia Risk Reduction (MOCHAD-10) scale examined motivation for lifestyle change. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of willingness and motivation to increase physical activity. Results: Data from 3,948 individuals showed most people were moderately/very physically active (80%). People more likely to be physically active had better health and education, were older, male, and had a partner. People willing to increase physical activity (73%) were more likely to be younger, non-White, underweight, had better health and lifestyles, and had experience caring for someone with dementia. People with higher levels of motivation to change lifestyle (MOCHAD-10 subscales) were more likely to be female, younger, in poorer physical/mental health, had lower perceived mental activity, and were a carer for someone with dementia. Conclusion: Men and those with better health status were more physically active. Those who exercised less and those who were more motivated to increase physical activity were not necessarily able to be physically active. Multisectoral public health strategies should seek to use the high motivation levels among this group to mitigate the barriers related to physical activity for dementia risk reduction.

Citation

Oliveira, D., Knight, H., Jones, K. A., Ogollah, R., & Orrell, M. (2022). Motivation and willingness to increase physical activity for dementia risk reduction: Cross-Sectional UK survey with people aged 50 and over. Aging and Mental Health, 26(9), 1899-1908. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2021.1984393

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Sep 15, 2021
Online Publication Date Oct 4, 2021
Publication Date 2022
Deposit Date Sep 20, 2021
Publicly Available Date Oct 5, 2022
Journal Aging & Mental Health
Print ISSN 1360-7863
Electronic ISSN 1364-6915
Publisher Routledge
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 26
Issue 9
Pages 1899-1908
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2021.1984393
Keywords Psychiatry and Mental health; Geriatrics and Gerontology; Gerontology; Pshychiatric Mental Health
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/6292209
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13607863.2021.1984393?journalCode=camh20
Additional Information This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging & Mental Health on 4/10/2021, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2021.1984393

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