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Web-Based Decision Aid to Assist Help-Seeking Choices for Young People Who Self-Harm: Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

Rowe, Sarah L.; Patel, Krisna; French, Rebecca S.; Henderson, Claire; Ougrin, Dennis; Slade, Mike; Moran, Paul

Authors

Sarah L. Rowe

Krisna Patel

Rebecca S. French

Claire Henderson

Dennis Ougrin

MIKE SLADE M.SLADE@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor in Mental Health Recovery and Social Inclusion

Paul Moran



Abstract

Background: Adolescents who self-harm are often unsure how or where to get help. We developed a web-based personalised decision aid (DA), designed to support young people in decision-making about seeking help for their self-harm.
Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the DA intervention and the randomised controlled trial (RCT) in a school setting.
Methods: We conducted a 2-group, single blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial in a school setting. Participants aged 12-18 years who reported self-harm in the past 12 months were randomised to either a web-based DA or to general information about mood and feelings. Feasibility of recruitment, randomisation and follow-up rates were assessed, as was acceptability of the intervention and study procedures. Descriptive data were collected on outcome measures examining decision-making and help-seeking behaviour. Qualitative interviews were conducted with young people, parents/carers and staff, and subjected to thematic analysis to explore their views of the DA and study processes.
Results: Parental consent was a significant barrier to young people participating in the trial, with only 208 (18%) of the 1,164 parent/guardians contacted for consent responding to study invitations. Where parental consent was obtained, we were able to recruit 82% (n=170) of young people into the study. Of those young people screened, 14% (n=23) had self-harmed in the past year. Ten participants were randomised to receiving the DA and 13 were randomised to the control group. Four-week follow-up assessments were completed with all participants. The DA had good acceptability but qualitative interviews suggested that a DA that addressed broader mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and self-harm may be more beneficial.
Conclusions: A broad-based mental health DA addressing a wide range of psychosocial problems may be useful for young people. The requirement for parental consent is a key barrier to intervention research on self-harm in the school setting. Adaptations to the research design and/or the intervention are needed before generalisable research about DAs can be successfully conducted in a school setting.

Citation

Rowe, S. L., Patel, K., French, R. S., Henderson, C., Ougrin, D., Slade, M., & Moran, P. (2018). Web-Based Decision Aid to Assist Help-Seeking Choices for Young People Who Self-Harm: Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial. JMIR Mental Health, 5(1), https://doi.org/10.2196/mental.8098

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Nov 16, 2017
Online Publication Date Jan 30, 2018
Publication Date Jan 30, 2018
Deposit Date Nov 20, 2017
Publicly Available Date Jan 30, 2018
Journal JMIR Mental Health
Electronic ISSN 2368-7959
Publisher JMIR Publications
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 5
Issue 1
Article Number e10
DOI https://doi.org/10.2196/mental.8098
Keywords Adolescents, self-harm, decision aid, intervention, school, feasibility, RCT, ethics
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/48229
Publisher URL http://mental.jmir.org/2018/1/e10/
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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