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Domesticating cleaner cookstoves for improved respiratory health: Using approaches from the sanitation sector to explore the adoption and sustained use of improved cooking technologies in Nepal

Jewitt, Sarah; Smallman-Raynor, Matthew; Binaya, C.K.; Robinson, Benjamin; Adhikari, Puspanjali; Evans, Catrin; Karmacharya, Biraj; Bolton, Charlotte E.; Hall, Ian P.

Domesticating cleaner cookstoves for improved respiratory health: Using approaches from the sanitation sector to explore the adoption and sustained use of improved cooking technologies in Nepal Thumbnail


Authors

SARAH JEWITT SARAH.JEWITT@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Human Geography and Development

C.K. Binaya

Benjamin Robinson

Puspanjali Adhikari

Dr CATRIN EVANS CATRIN.EVANS@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Evidence Based Healthcare

Biraj Karmacharya

IAN HALL IAN.HALL@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Molecular Medicine



Abstract

Drawing on village-based data from Nepal, this paper explores the transferability of the Integrated Behavioural Model for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (IBM-WASH) to the clean cooking sector and its potential to elucidate how barriers to improved cookstove adoption and sustained use intersect at different scales. The paper also explores the potential of IBM-WASH, behaviour settings theory and domestication analysis to collectively inform effective behaviour change techniques and interventions that promote both adoption and sustained use of health-promoting technologies. Information on cookstove use in the community since 2012 enables valuable insights to be gained on how kitchen settings and associated cooking behaviour were re-configured as homes and stoves were re-built following the April 2015 earthquake. The methodological approach comprised of semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, direct observation and household surveys. The findings indicated that the IBM-WASH framework translated well to the improved cookstove sector, capturing key influences on clean cooking transitions across the model's three dimensions (context, psychosocial and technology) at all five levels. Understandings gained from utilising IBM-WASH were enhanced – especially at the individual and habitual levels – by domestication analysis and settings theory which elucidated how different cooking technologies were incorporated (or not) within physical structures, everyday lives and routine behaviour. The paper concludes that this combination of approaches has potential applicability for initiatives seeking to promote improved environmental health at community-wide scales.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jul 5, 2022
Online Publication Date Jul 14, 2022
Publication Date Sep 1, 2022
Deposit Date Jul 6, 2022
Publicly Available Date Jul 15, 2023
Journal Social Science and Medicine
Print ISSN 0277-9536
Electronic ISSN 1873-5347
Publisher Elsevier BV
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 308
Article Number 115201
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.115201
Keywords History and Philosophy of Science; Health (social science)
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/8852087
Publisher URL https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027795362200507X?via%3Dihub

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