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Familial aggregation of gout and relative genetic and environmental contributions: a nationwide population study in Taiwan

Kuo, Chang-Fu; Grainge, Matthew J; See, Lai-Chu; Yu, Kuang-Hui; Luo, Shue-Fen; Valdes, Ana M.; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael

Authors

Chang-Fu Kuo

Lai-Chu See

Kuang-Hui Yu

Shue-Fen Luo

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ANA VALDES Ana.Valdes@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Molecular & Genetic Epidemiology

Michael Doherty



Abstract

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Objective: To examine familial aggregation of gout and to estimate the heritability and environmental contributions to gout susceptibility in the general population. Methods: Using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database in Taiwan, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study of data collected from 22 643 748 beneficiaries of the NHI in 2004; among them 1 045 059 individuals had physician-diagnosed gout. We estimated relative risks (RR) of gout in individuals with affected first-degree and second-degree relatives and relative contributions of genes (heritability), common environment shared by family members and non-shared environment to gout susceptibility. Results: RRs for gout were significantly higher in individuals with affected first-degree relatives (men, 1.91 (95% CI 1.90 to 1.93); women, 1.97 (95% CI 1.94 to 1.99)) and also in those with affected second-degree relatives (men, 1.27 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.31); women, 1.40 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.46)). RRs (95% CIs) for individuals with an affected twin, sibling, offspring, parent, grandchild, nephew/niece, uncle/aunt and grandparent were 8.02 (6.95 to 9.26), 2.59 (2.54 to 2.63), 1.96 (1.95 to 1.97), 1.93 (1.91 to 1.94), 1.48 (1.43 to 1.53), 1.40 (1.32 to 1.47), 1.31 (1.24 to 1.39), and 1.26 (1.21 to 1.30), respectively. The relative contributions of heritability, common and non-shared environmental factors to phenotypic variance of gout were 35.1, 28.1 and 36.8% in men and 17.0, 18.5 and 64.5% in women, respectively. Conclusions: This population-based study confirms that gout aggregates within families. The risk of gout is higher in people with a family history. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to gout aetiology, and the relative contributions are sexually dimorphic.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2015-02
Journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Print ISSN 0003-4967
Electronic ISSN 1468-2060
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 74
Issue 2
Pages 369-374
APA6 Citation Kuo, C., Grainge, M. J., See, L., Yu, K., Luo, S., Valdes, A. M., …Doherty, M. (2015). Familial aggregation of gout and relative genetic and environmental contributions: a nationwide population study in Taiwan. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 74(2), 369-374. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204067
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204067
Keywords Adolescent, Adult, Age distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cross-sectional studies, Environment, Female, Genetic predisposition to disease, Gout/epidemiology/genetics, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Sex distribution, Socioeconomic factors, Taiw
Publisher URL http://ard.bmj.com/content/74/2/369
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0





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