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Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling

Magennis, Eugene Peter; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Sui, Cheng; Spain, Sebastian G.; Bradshaw, David; Churchley, David; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Winzer, Klaus; Alexander, Cameron

Authors

Eugene Peter Magennis

Francisco Fernandez-Trillo

Cheng Sui

Sebastian G. Spain sebastian.spain@nottingham.ac.uk

David Bradshaw

David Churchley

Giuseppe Mantovani

Klaus Winzer klaus.winzer@nottingham.ac.uk

Cameron Alexander cameron.alexander@notingham.ac.uk



Abstract

The detection and inactivation of pathogenic strains of bacteria continues to be an important therapeutic goal. Hence, there is a need for materials that can bind selectively to specific microorganisms, for diagnostic or anti-infective applications, but which can be formed from simple and inexpensive building blocks. Here, we exploit bacterial redox systems to induce a copper-mediated radical polymerisation of synthetic monomers at cell surfaces, generating polymers in situ that bind strongly to the microorganisms which produced them. This ‘bacteria-instructed synthesis’ can be carried out with a variety of microbial strains, and we show that the polymers produced are self-selective binding agents for the ‘instructing’ cell types. We further expand on the bacterial redox chemistries to ‘click’ fluorescent reporters onto polymers directly at the surfaces of a range of clinical isolate strains, allowing rapid, facile and simultaneous binding and visualisation of pathogens.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jul 1, 2014
Journal Nature Materials
Print ISSN 1476-1122
Electronic ISSN 1476-1122
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 13
Issue 7
APA6 Citation Magennis, E. P., Fernandez-Trillo, F., Sui, C., Spain, S. G., Bradshaw, D., Churchley, D., …Alexander, C. (2014). Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling. Nature Materials, 13(7), doi:10.1038/nmat3949
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3949
Keywords Biomaterials, molecular recognition, antimicrobial resistance, smart polymers, bacterial detection
Publisher URL http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v13/n7/full/nmat3949.html
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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