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Rate after-effects fail to transfer cross-modally: evidence for distributed sensory timing mechanisms

Motola, Aysha; Heron, James; McGraw, Paul V.; Roach, Neil W.; Whitaker, David

Authors

Aysha Motola

James Heron

PAUL MCGRAW paul.mcgraw@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Visual Neuroscience

NEIL ROACH NEIL.ROACH@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Associate Professor

David Whitaker



Abstract

Accurate time perception is critical for a number of human behaviours, such as understanding speech and the appreciation of music. However, it remains unresolved whether sensory time perception is mediated by a central timing component regulating all senses, or by a set of distributed mechanisms, each dedicated to a single sensory modality and operating in a largely independent manner. To address this issue, we conducted a range of unimodal and cross-modal rate adaptation experiments, in order to establish the degree of specificity of classical after- effects of sensory adaptation. Adapting to a fast rate of sensory stimulation typically makes a moderate rate appear slower (repulsive after-effect), and vice versa. A central timing hypothesis predicts general transfer of adaptation effects across modalities, whilst distributed mechanisms predict a high degree of sensory selectivity. Rate perception was quantified by a method of temporal reproduction across all combinations of visual, auditory and tactile senses. Robust repulsive after-effects were observed in all unimodal rate conditions, but were not observed for any cross-modal pairings. Our results show that sensory timing abilities are adaptable but, crucially, that this change is modality-specific - an outcome that is consistent with a distributed sensory timing hypothesis.

Citation

Motola, A., Heron, J., McGraw, P. V., Roach, N. W., & Whitaker, D. (2018). Rate after-effects fail to transfer cross-modally: evidence for distributed sensory timing mechanisms. Scientific Reports, 8, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-19218-z

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Dec 19, 2017
Publication Date Jan 17, 2018
Deposit Date Jan 19, 2018
Publicly Available Date Jan 19, 2018
Journal Scientific Reports
Print ISSN 2045-2322
Electronic ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 8
Article Number 924
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-19218-z
Keywords Human behavior; Sensory processing
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/49182
Publisher URL http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-19218-z
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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