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Older adult forensic mental health patients’ views on barriers, facilitators and ‘what works’ to enable better quality of life, health and wellbeing and to reduce risk of reoffending and harm to self and others

Walker, Kate; Yates, Jen; Dening, Tom; Vollm, Birgit; Tomlin, Jack; Griffiths, Chris

Older adult forensic mental health patients’ views on barriers, facilitators and ‘what works’ to enable better quality of life, health and wellbeing and to reduce risk of reoffending and harm to self and others Thumbnail


Authors

Kate Walker

JEN YATES Jen.Yates@nottingham.ac.uk
Assistant Professor in Mental Health

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TOM DENING TOM.DENING@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Clinical Professor in Dementia Research

Birgit Vollm

Jack Tomlin

Chris Griffiths



Contributors

Abstract

Introduction
Research evidence that can inform service provision and treatment requirements for older (aged 55 years and above) forensic mental health patients is lacking, particularly that which is based on patients’ own preferences and experiences. This study aimed to gain an effective understanding, based on patients’ perspectives, of the service provision in forensic mental health inpatient and community services; investigating what could improve or hinder their quality of life, health, wellbeing, progress, and recovery.
Method
A qualitative approach was taken to examine the accounts of patients. Interviews (semi-structured) with 37 older forensic mental health patients either residing in secure units or in the community were conducted. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.
Results
Two global themes: ‘Enablers and Facilitators’ and ‘Threats and Barriers’ were identified; these were at three levels: environmental, interpersonal and individual. Results indicated that: the physical and social environment should be adapted to accommodate the needs of older patients (e.g., for physical health, frailty, and poor mobility); prosocial interpersonal relationships with family, other patients and staff needed to be promoted; and hope and positive future focus needed to be embedded to aid recovery.
Discussion
Findings suggest that multilevel and comprehensive support, that is individualised, is required for this population. This is needed so that: patients are residing in suitable environments that address their physical, mental, and criminal justice needs; social connectedness forms part of their recovery journey; and hope, purposefulness and personal agency is facilitated.

Deposit Date Apr 28, 2022
Publicly Available Date Apr 29, 2022
Series Title East Midlands Research into Ageing Network (EMRAN) Discussion Paper Series
Series Number 46
Series ISSN 2059-3341
Keywords Older people, forensic, mental health, criminology, reoffending, self harm
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/7837131
Publisher URL https://doi.org/10.17639/36pc-f722
Related Public URLs https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/emran/
Additional Information Issue 46, March 2022

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