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Innovations in practice: an objective measure of attention, impulsivity and activity reduces time to confirm attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis in children: a completed audit cycle

Hall, Charlotte L.; Selby, Kim; Guo, Boliang; Valentine, Althea Z.; Walker, Gemma M.; Hollis, Chris

Authors

Kim Selby

Gemma M. Walker

CHRIS HOLLIS chris.hollis@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Digital Mental Health



Abstract

Background

Diagnosing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young people typically relies on clinical observation and subjective parent, teacher and self-reports. The subjective nature of reports combined with contradictory or missing data can result in diagnostic uncertainty and delay. The aim of this study was to assess whether the addition of an objective test of attention, impulsivity and activity (QbTest) as an adjunct to standard ADHD assessment could accelerate the diagnostic process in routine National Health Service (NHS) settings.

Method


In a pre vs. post-test audit design, case records were examined in 40 cases diagnosed without the QbTest [pre-QbTest group] and 40 cases diagnosed with the QbTest [QbTest group], recording the number of consultations until a confirmed ADHD diagnosis was reached.

Results


Using Poisson regression, significantly fewer clinician consultations (mean 2.18 vs. 3.05; p < .02) were required to confirm the diagnosis of ADHD when the QbTest was used to augment assessment in comparison to standard assessment as usual.

Conclusions

The findings suggest that the addition of the QbTest to standard clinical assessment may reduce time to diagnosis and potentially result in cost savings to the NHS. These preliminary data suggest that there is a potentially clinically meaningful benefit of adding the QbTest to routine clinical ADHD assessment and this should be examined next in the context of a randomised controlled trial.

Citation

Hall, C. L., Selby, K., Guo, B., Valentine, A. Z., Walker, G. M., & Hollis, C. (2016). Innovations in practice: an objective measure of attention, impulsivity and activity reduces time to confirm attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis in children: a completed audit cycle. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 21(3), 175-178. doi:10.1111/camh.12140

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jan 4, 2016
Deposit Date Feb 3, 2016
Publicly Available Date Feb 3, 2016
Journal Child and Adolescent Mental Health
Print ISSN 1475-357X
Electronic ISSN 1475-3588
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Not Peer Reviewed
Volume 21
Issue 3
Pages 175-178
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/camh.12140
Keywords Qb test, Audit, Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Diagnosing, Assessment
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/31486
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12140
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hall, C. L., Selby, K., Guo, B., Valentine, A. Z., Walker, G. M. and Hollis, C. (2016), Innovations in Practice: an objective measure of attention, impulsivity and activity reduces time to confirm attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis in children – a completed audit cycle. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1111/camh.12140. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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