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Xylan degrading enzymes from fungal sources

Kirikyali, N.; Connerton, Ian F.

Authors

N. Kirikyali

IAN CONNERTON IAN.CONNERTON@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Northern Foods Professor of Food Safety



Abstract

Fungi have the ability to degrade xylan as the major component of plant cell wall hemicellulose. Fungi have evolved batteries of xylanolytic enzymes that concertedly act to depolymerise xylan backbones decorated with variable carbohydrate branches. As an alternative to acid extraction in industrial processes the combination of endo-1,4-β-xylanase and β-xylosidase can reduce xylan to xylose. However, unlike chemical extraction procedures enzyme systems can selectively hydrolyse α-L-arabinofuranosyl, 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronopyranosyl, acetyl and phenolic branches, and therefore have the potential to deconstruct hemicellulose whilst retaining desirable structural integrity and functionality. The sources, structures and catalytic activities of fungal xylanolytic enzymes are reviewed and discussed in the context of their biotechnological potential.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Apr 25, 2015
Journal Journal of Proteomics & Enzymology
Electronic ISSN 2324-9099
Publisher OMICS International
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 4
Issue 1
Article Number 118
APA6 Citation Kirikyali, N., & Connerton, I. F. (2015). Xylan degrading enzymes from fungal sources. Journal of Biocatalysis and Biotransformation, 4(1), doi:10.4172/10.4172/jpe.1000118
DOI https://doi.org/10.4172/10.4172/jpe.1000118
Keywords Hemicellulose, Xylan, B-xylosidase, Endo-xylanase, Xylose
Publisher URL http://www.scitechnol.com/xylan-degrading-enzymes-from-fungal-sources-Qp7K.php?article_id=3172
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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