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Acceptability of a nurse-led non-pharmacological complex intervention for knee pain: Nurse and patient views and experiences

Nomikos, Polykarpos Angelos; Hall, Michelle C.; Fuller, Amy; Ogollah, Reuben; Valdes, Ana M.; Doherty, Michael; Walsh, David Andrew; das Nair, Roshan; Abhishek, Abhishek

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Authors

Polykarpos Angelos Nomikos

Michelle C. Hall

AMY FULLER Amy.Fuller@nottingham.ac.uk
Research Fellow

REUBEN OGOLLAH REUBEN.OGOLLAH@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Associate Professor of Medical Statistics and Clinical Trials

Michael Doherty

DAVID WALSH david.walsh@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Rheumatology

ROSHAN NAIR Roshan.dasnair@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology



Abstract

Objectives The overall purpose of this research programme is to develop and test the feasibility of a complex intervention for knee pain delivered by a nurse, and comprising both non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions. In this first phase, we examined the acceptability of the non-pharmacological component of the intervention; issues faced in delivery, and resolved possible challenges to delivery. Methods Eighteen adults with chronic knee pain were recruited from the community. The intervention comprised holistic assessment, education, exercise, weight-loss advice (where appropriate) and advice on adjunctive treatments such as hot/cold treatments, footwear modification and walking aids. After nurse training, the intervention was delivered in four sessions spread over five weeks. Participants had one to one semi-structured interview at the end of the intervention. The nurse was interviewed after the last visit of the last participant. These were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes were identified by one author through framework analysis of the transcripts, and cross-checked by another. Results Most participants found the advice from the nurse easy to follow and were satisfied with the package, though some felt that too much information was provided too soon. The intervention changed their perception of managing knee pain, learning that it can be improved with self-management. However, participants thought that the most challenging part of the intervention was fitting the exercise regime into their daily routine. The nurse found discussion of goal setting to be challenging. Conclusion The nurse-led package of care is acceptable within a research setting. The results are promising and will be applied in a feasibility randomised-controlled trial.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Dec 26, 2021
Online Publication Date Jan 13, 2022
Publication Date Jan 1, 2022
Deposit Date Jan 24, 2022
Publicly Available Date Jan 24, 2022
Journal PLoS ONE
Electronic ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 17
Issue 1
Article Number e0262422
DOI https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0262422
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/7336876
Publisher URL https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0262422

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