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A conserved protein, BcmA, mediates motility, biofilm formation, and host colonisation in Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli

Cogger-Ward, Robert; Collins, Adam; McLean, Denise; Dehinsilu, Jacob; Huett, Alan

Authors

Robert Cogger-Ward

Adam Collins

Denise McLean

Jacob Dehinsilu

ALAN HUETT Alan.Huett@nottingham.ac.uk
Assistant Professor



Abstract

Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) is a non-diarrhoeagenic intestinal E. coli pathotype associated with Crohn’s Disease. AIEC pathogenesis is characterised by biofilm formation, adhesion to and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells, and intracellular replication within epithelial cells and macrophages. Here, we identify and characterise a protein in the prototypical AIEC strain LF82 which is required for efficient biofilm formation and dispersal – LF82_p314. LF82 ΔLF82_314 have defective swimming and swarming motility, indicating LF82_p314 is important for flagellar-mediated motility, and thus surface colonisation and biofilm dispersal. Flagellar morphology and chemotaxis in liquid appear unaffected by deletion of LF82_314, suggesting LF82_p314 does not elicit an effect on flagella biogenesis or environmental sensing. Flagellar motility has been implicated in AIEC virulence, therefore we assessed the role of LF82_p314 in host colonisation using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. We found that LF82 ΔLF82_314 have an impaired ability to colonise the C. elegans compared to wild-type LF82. Phylogenetic analysis showed that LF82_314 is conserved in several major enterobacterial pathogens, and suggests the gene may have been acquired horizontally in several genera. Our data suggests LF82_p314 may be a novel component in the flagellar motility pathway and is a novel determinant of AIEC colonisation. Our findings have potential implications not only for the pathogenesis of Crohn’s Disease, but also for the course of infection in several major bacterial pathogens. We propose a new designation for LF82_314, biofilm coupled to motility A, or bcmA.

Other Type Other
Publication Date Apr 11, 2019
APA6 Citation Cogger-Ward, R., Collins, A., McLean, D., Dehinsilu, J., & Huett, A. (2019). A conserved protein, BcmA, mediates motility, biofilm formation, and host colonisation in Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli
DOI https://doi.org/10.1101/606798
Related Public URLs https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/606798v1

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