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The Helm Wind of Cross Fell

Veale, Lucy; Endfield, G.H.

Authors

Lucy Veale

G.H. Endfield



Abstract

Crossfell is the highest point along the 268-mile route of the Pennine Way, at 893 metres (Figure 1). The climate of the North Pennines is temperate, with a small area classified as subarctic (Manley, 1936). The hills generally receive more precipitation, stronger winds, and colder temperatures than the surrounding areas. They are also home to the Helm, England’s only named wind.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jan 1, 2014
Journal Weather
Print ISSN 0043-1656
Electronic ISSN 0043-1656
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 69
Issue 1
APA6 Citation Veale, L., & Endfield, G. (2014). The Helm Wind of Cross Fell. Weather, 69(1), doi:10.1002/wea.2165
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/wea.2165
Keywords Helm Wind; Pennines; History; Newspapers; Archives; Accounts
Publisher URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wea.2165/full
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information This is the accepted version of the following article: Veale, L. and Endfield, G. (2014), The Helm Wind of Cross Fell. Weather, 69: 3–7. doi: 10.1002/wea.2165, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wi.../10.1002/wea.2165/full.

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Veale and Endfield Weather 2014.pdf (459 Kb)
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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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