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Fuel cell technology for domestic built environment applications: state of-the-art review

Elmer, Theo; Worall, Mark; Wu, Shenyi; Riffat, Saffa

Authors

Theo Elmer theo.elmer@nottingham.ac.uk

Mark Worall mark.worall@nottingham.ac.uk

Shenyi Wu

SAFFA RIFFAT saffa.riffat@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Sustainable Energy Systems



Abstract

Fuel cells produce heat when generating electricity, thus they are of particular interest for combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling heat and power (CCHP) applications, also known as tri-generation systems. CHP and tri-generation systems offer high energy conversion efficiency and hence the potential to reduce fuel costs and CO2 emissions. This article serves to provide a state-of-the-art review of fuel cell technology operating in the domestic built environment in CHP and tri-generation system applications. The review aims to carry out an assessment of the following topics: (1) the operational advantages fuel cells offer in CHP and tri-generation system configurations, specifically, compared to conventional combustion-based technologies such as Stirling engines, (2) how decarbonisation, running cost and energy security in the domestic built environment may be addressed through the use of fuel cell technology, and (3) what has been done to date and what needs to be done in the future. The article commences with a review of fuel cell technology, then moves on to examine fuel cell CHP systems operating in the domestic built environment, and finally explores fuel cell tri-generation systems in domestic built environment applications. The article concludes with an assessment of the present development of, and future challenges for, domestic fuel cells operating in CHP and tri-generation systems. As fuel cells are an emergent technology the article draws on a breadth of literature, data and experience, mostly from the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, America and Australia.

Fuel cells are a technology of the future here today, providing a change in the way heat and power are supplied to end users. Fuel cells operating in CHP and tri-generation systems in domestic built environment applications could finally provide the means by which energy generation can transfer from centralised to decentralised locales in a sustainable and effective manner.

Citation

Elmer, T., Worall, M., Wu, S., & Riffat, S. (2015). Fuel cell technology for domestic built environment applications: state of-the-art review. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 42, doi:10.1016/j.rser.2014.10.080

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Oct 21, 2014
Online Publication Date Nov 12, 2014
Publication Date Feb 1, 2015
Deposit Date May 5, 2016
Publicly Available Date May 5, 2016
Journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Electronic ISSN 1364-0321
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 42
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2014.10.080
Keywords Fuel cell; combined heat and power; combined cooling heat and power; tri-generation; domestic
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/33101
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2014.10.080
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0

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Fuel Cell Technology For Domestic Built Environment Applications State Of-The-Art Review_with_figures.pdf (495 Kb)
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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0





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