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Vision dominates audition in adults but not children: A meta-analysis of the Colavita effect

Hirst, Rebecca J.; Cragg, Lucy; Allen, Harriet A.

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Authors

Rebecca J. Hirst

LUCY CRAGG lucy.cragg@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Developmental Psychology

HARRIET ALLEN H.A.Allen@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Lifespan Psychology



Abstract

The Colavita effect occurs when participants respond only to the visual element of an audio-visual stimulus. This visual dominance effect is proposed to arise from asymmetric facilitation and inhibition between modalities. It has also been proposed that, unlike adults, children appear predisposed to auditory information. We provide the first quantitative synthesis of studies exploring the Colavita effect, combining data from 70 experiments across 14 studies. A mixed-meta-regression model was applied to assess whether the Colavita effect is influenced by methodological factors and age group tested. Studies reporting response time data were used to test for the presence of asymmetrical facilitation between modalities. Studies with adult participants yielded a medium, approaching large, effect size. Studies exploring the Colavita effect in children yielded no Colavita effect. Across adult and child studies, no methodological factors influenced the effect. Contrary to asymmetrical facilitation, response time data suggested a general slowing under bimodal conditions. These findings suggest that whilst vision dominates in adults, this effect is absent in childhood.

Citation

Hirst, R. J., Cragg, L., & Allen, H. A. (2018). Vision dominates audition in adults but not children: A meta-analysis of the Colavita effect. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 94, 286-301. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.07.012

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jul 22, 2018
Online Publication Date Jul 23, 2018
Publication Date Nov 30, 2018
Deposit Date Jul 25, 2018
Publicly Available Date Oct 8, 2018
Journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Print ISSN 0149-7634
Electronic ISSN 1873-7528
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 94
Pages 286-301
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.07.012
Keywords Colavita Effect; Sensory Dominance; Visual dominance;
Meta-analysis; Development
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/947532
Publisher URL https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763417307674

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