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Relationships Between Neuronal Oscillatory Amplitude and Dynamic Functional Connectivity

Tewarie, Preejas; Hunt, Benjamin A. E.; Hunt, Benjamin A E; O'Neill, George C.; O'Neill, George C.; Byrne, Aine; Aquino, Kevin; Bauer, Markus; Mullinger, Karen J; Coombes, Stephen; Brookes, Matthew J

Authors

Preejas Tewarie

Benjamin A. E. Hunt benjamin.hunt@nottingham.ac.uk

Benjamin A E Hunt

George C. O'Neill prejaas.tewarie@nottingham.ac.uk

George C. O'Neill george.oneill@nottingham.ac.uk

Aine Byrne pmxab1@nottingham.ac.uk

Kevin Aquino

Markus Bauer markus.bauer@nottingham.ac.uk

Karen J Mullinger karen.mullinger@nottingham.ac.uk

Matthew J Brookes matthew.brookes@nottingham.ac.uk



Abstract

Event related fluctuations of neural oscillatory amplitude are reported widely in the context of cognitive processing and are typically interpreted as a marker of brain ‘activity’. However, the precise nature of these effects remains unclear; in particular, whether such fluctuations reflect local dynamics, integration between regions, or both, is unknown. Here, using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we show that movement induced oscillatory modulation is associated with transient connectivity between sensorimotor regions. Further, in resting state data, we demonstrate a significant association between oscillatory modulation and dynamic connectivity. A confound with such empirical measurements is that increased amplitude necessarily means increased signal to noise ratio (SNR): this means that the question of whether amplitude and connectivity are genuinely coupled, or whether increased connectivity is observed purely due to increased SNR is unanswered. Here we counter this problem by analogy with computational models which show that, in the presence of global network coupling and local multistability, the link between oscillatory modulation and long range connectivity is a natural consequence of neural networks. Our results provide evidence for the notion that connectivity is mediated by neural oscillations, and suggest that time-frequency spectrograms are not merely a description of local synchrony but also reflect fluctuations in long range connectivity.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jun 1, 2018
Journal Cerebral Cortex
Print ISSN 1047-3211
Electronic ISSN 1460-2199
Publisher Oxford University Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 29
Issue 6
Pages 2668-2681
APA6 Citation O’Neill, G. C., Hunt, B. A. E., Tewarie, P., Hunt, B. A. E., O'Neill, G. C., Byrne, A., …Brookes, M. J. (2018). Relationships Between Neuronal Oscillatory Amplitude and Dynamic Functional Connectivity. Cerebral Cortex, 29(6), 2668-2681. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhy136
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy136
Keywords Dynamic functional connectivity; Amplitude envelopes; Magnetoencephalography; Coupled neural masses; Neural mass bifurcation; Neuronal oscillations; Time-frequency
Publisher URL https://academic.oup.com/cercor/article/29/6/2668/5036075
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cerebral Cortex following peer review. The version of record is available online at: https://academic.oup.co...ticle/29/6/2668/5036075

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf


Envelope_FC_CerebCortex_revision_v9.pdf (768 Kb)
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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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