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Atmospheric air plasma induces increased cell aggregation during the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms

Kwandou, Goldina; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Prescott, Stuart W.; Spicer, Patrick T.; Cullen, P.J.

Authors

Goldina Kwandou

Anne Mai-Prochnow

Stuart W. Prescott

Patrick T. Spicer

P.J. Cullen Patrick.Cullen@nottingham.ac.uk



Abstract

Atmospheric air plasma has previously been shown to be a novel and effective method for biofilm eradication. Here we study the effects of plasma on both microbial inactivation and induced structural modification for forming biofilms. New structures are created from aggregates of extracellular polysaccharides and dead bacterial cells, forming a protective and resilient matrix in which the remaining living cells grow and reproduce under proper growth conditions. The new colonies are found to be more resilient in this state, reducing the efficacy of subsequent plasma treatment. We verify that the observed effect is not caused by chemicals produced by plasma reactive species, but instead by the physical processes of drying and convection caused by the plasma discharge.

Journal Article Type Article
Journal Plasma Processes and Polymers
Print ISSN 1612-8850
Electronic ISSN 1612-8869
Publisher Wiley-VCH Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
APA6 Citation Kwandou, G., Mai-Prochnow, A., Prescott, S. W., Spicer, P. T., & Cullen, P. (in press). Atmospheric air plasma induces increased cell aggregation during the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms. Plasma Processes and Polymers, https://doi.org/10.1002/ppap.201700212
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/ppap.201700212
Keywords Atmospheric plasma; Biofilms; Cell agglomeration
Publisher URL https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ppap.201700212
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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