Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

It’s only fair: blood donors are more sensitive to violations of fairness norms than non-donors: converging psychometric and ultimatum game evidence

Ferguson, Eamonn; Lawrence, Claire

Authors

Claire Lawrence



Abstract

Background and Objectives: The design of effective donor recruitment campaigns requires an accurate understanding of donor motivations. This requires cross-validation of theoretically derived, psychometrically assessed motivations with behavioural preferences. Theoretical models suggest that blood donors should be more sensitive than non-donors to violations of fairness norms. Specifically, active blood donors, compared to non-donors, should endorse beliefs of reciprocal fairness, norms of both positive and negative reciprocity and reject more unfair offers in a behavioural economic game (the ultimatum game). The current study is the first to test this hypothesis.

Materials and Methods: Two studies are reported. One experimental psychometric study (N = 400), and one behavioural economic game using the ultimatum game (N = 60)

Results: Consistent with the predictions, active and lapsed donors, compared to non-donors, were more likely to endorse beliefs of reciprocal fairness and active donors to endorse norms of both positive and negative reciprocity and reject more unfair offers in the ultimatum game. This pattern of motivations was unique to blood donors and not observed for other health (i.e., being on the organ donor register) and non-health (e.g., volunteering) pro-sociality.

Conclusion: Blood donors heightened sensitivity to unfairness violations. This indicates a very clear and specific line for the development of interventions that align fairness, self-interest and reciprocity, for example Voluntary Reciprocal Altruism (VRA). We also highlight the importance of establishing intervention development within a clinical trials model and emphasise why experimental work of this type is vital.

Citation

Ferguson, E., & Lawrence, C. (2018). It’s only fair: blood donors are more sensitive to violations of fairness norms than non-donors: converging psychometric and ultimatum game evidence. Vox Sanguinis, 113(3), https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12636

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jan 9, 2018
Online Publication Date Feb 9, 2018
Publication Date Apr 30, 2018
Deposit Date Jan 15, 2018
Publicly Available Date Feb 10, 2019
Journal Vox Sanguinis
Print ISSN 0042-9007
Electronic ISSN 1423-0410
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 113
Issue 3
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12636
Keywords Blood donation; Altruism; Fairness; Ultimatum game
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/49098
Publisher URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/vox.12636/abstract
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: erguson, E. and Lawrence, C. (2018), It is only fair: blood donors are more sensitive to violations of fairness norms than nondonors – converging psychometric and ultimatum game evidence. Vox Sanguinis. doi: 10.1111/vox.12636, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12636. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Files

Ferguson and Lawrence. It’s Only Fair.Vox sanguinis_final accepted version.pdf (784 Kb)
PDF

Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





You might also like



Downloadable Citations