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Evaluation of a novel intervention providing insight into the tobacco industry to prevent the uptake of smoking in school-aged children: a mixed-methods study

Szatkowski, Lisa; Taylor, John; Taylor, Amy; Lewis, Sarah; Qi, Wu; Parrott, Steve; McNeill, Ann; Britton, John; Bauld, Linda; Jones, Laura L.; Bains, Manpreet

Authors

Lisa Szatkowski lisa.szatkowski@nottingham.ac.uk

John Taylor

Amy Taylor

Sarah Lewis sarah.lewis@nottingham.ac.uk

Wu Qi

Steve Parrott

Ann McNeill

John Britton j.britton@outlook.com

Linda Bauld

Laura L. Jones

Manpreet Bains manpreet.bains@nottingham.ac.uk



Abstract

Objectives: Evidence from the US Truth® campaign suggests that interventions focusing on tobacco industry practices and ethics may be effective in preventing youth smoking uptake. We developed, piloted and evaluated a school-based intervention based on this premise.

Methods: Exploratory study Students in Years 7–8 (aged 11–13) in two UK schools received Operation Smoke Storm, comprising three 50-minute classroom-based sessions in Year 7, an accompanying family booklet and a 1-hour classroom-based booster session in Year 8. We compared the risk and odds of ever smoking and susceptibility to smoking in Year 8 students in study schools post-intervention compared with students in control schools. Focus groups and interviews with students, teachers and parents evaluated the acceptability of the intervention.

Results: In intervention schools the combined prevalence of ever smoking and susceptibility increased from 18.2% in Year 7 to 33.8% in Year 8. There was no significant difference in the odds of a Year 8 student in an intervention school being an ever smoker or susceptible never smoker compared with controls [adjusted OR 1.28, 95%CI 0.83-1.97, p=0.263] and no significant difference in the odds of ever smoking (aOR 0.82, 95%CI 0.42-1.58, p=0.549). Teachers highlighted differences by academic ability in how well the messages presented were understood. Use of the family component was low but was received positively by parents who engaged with it.

Conclusions: Operation Smoke Storm is an acceptable resource for delivering smoking-prevention education but it does not appear to have reduced smoking and susceptibility.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Nov 1, 2017
Journal BMJ Open
Electronic ISSN 2044-6055
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 7
Article Number e018031
APA6 Citation Szatkowski, L., Taylor, J., Taylor, A., Lewis, S., Qi, W., Parrott, S., …Bains, M. (2017). Evaluation of a novel intervention providing insight into the tobacco industry to prevent the uptake of smoking in school-aged children: a mixed-methods study. BMJ Open, 7, https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018031
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018031
Publisher URL http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/11/e018031
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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