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The effect of thermal processing in oil on the macromolecular integrity and acrylamide formation from starch of three potato cultivars organically fertilized

Varzakas, Theo; Alghamdi, Asma; Alghamdi, Hanan; Linforth, Rob S.T.; Dinu, Vlad; Besong, Tabot D.; Gillis, Richard B.; Adams, Gary G.; Arapoglou, D.; Connerton, Ian F.; Harding, Stephen E.; Israilides, C.

Authors

Theo Varzakas tvarzakas@teikal.gr

Asma Alghamdi

Hanan Alghamdi

Vlad Dinu

Tabot D. Besong

Richard B. Gillis

Gary G. Adams

D. Arapoglou

IAN CONNERTON IAN.CONNERTON@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Northern Foods Professor of Food Safety

C. Israilides cisrailides@yahoo.gr



Abstract

Starches from three organically produced cultivars of potato tuber (Lady Rosetta, Spunta and Voyager) have been studied in relation to (i) acrylamide production (ii) macromolecular integrity after frying with extra virgin olive oil, soybean oil and corn oil. During cultivation, a treatment involving the combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilization under organic farming was applied (N1, P2, K1 where Ν1 = 1.3 g Ν per plant, P2 = 5.2 g P2O5 per plant, Κ1 = 4.0 g K2O per plant).

Potatoes fried in olive oil retained the highest glucose concentrations for all cultivars 0.85 ± 0.2 mmol/kg, followed by 0.48 ± 0.2 for those fried in corn oil and 0.40 ± 0.1 mmol/kg for those fried in soybean oil. The highest average fructose concentration was recorded for the samples fried in corn oil as 0.81 ± 0.2, followed by 0.80 ± 0.2 and 0.68 ± 0.3 mmol/kg for the samples fried in olive and soybean oils, respectively. Asparagine was the most abundant free amino acid in the three varieties tested, followed by glutamine and aspartic acid. The mean initial concentration of asparagine in raw potatoes tubers was 42.8 ± 1.6 mmoles kg−1 for Lady Rosetta, 34.6 ± 1.2 mmoles kg−1 (dry weight) for Spunta and 36.2 ± 2.0 mmoles kg−1 for Voyager. Lady Rosetta contained a significantly higher concentration of asparagine compared to the other two varieties (p < 0.05). The greatest quantity of acrylamide was observed in French fries derived from the potato variety Lady Rosetta when fried in soybean oil and it was 2,600 ± 440 μg/kg, followed by Spunta which was 2,280 ± 340 μg/kg and Voyager 1,120 ± 220 μg/kg. There is a significant reduction in the formation of acrylamide in the variety Voyager compared to the others (p = 0.05).

Citation

Varzakas, T., Alghamdi, A., Alghamdi, H., Linforth, R. S., Dinu, V., Besong, T. D., …Israilides, C. (2016). The effect of thermal processing in oil on the macromolecular integrity and acrylamide formation from starch of three potato cultivars organically fertilized. Cogent Food and Agriculture, 2, https://doi.org/10.1080/23311932.2016.1180950

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Apr 11, 2016
Publication Date May 6, 2016
Deposit Date May 9, 2016
Publicly Available Date May 11, 2016
Journal Cogent Food & Agriculture
Electronic ISSN 2331-1932
Publisher Taylor & Francis Open
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 2
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/23311932.2016.1180950
Keywords organic fertilization; French fries; olive oil, corn oil, soybean oil, starch, acrylamide
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/33187
Publisher URL http://cogentoa.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23311932.2016.1180950
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Additional Information The effect of thermal processing in oil on the macromolecular integrity and acrylamide formation from starch of three potato cultivars organically fertilized, Theo Varzakas, Asma Alghamdi, Hanan Alghamdi, Robert Linforth, Vlad Dinu, Tabot D. Besong, Richard B. Gillis, Gary G. Adams, D. Arapoglou, Ian F. Connerton, Stephen E. Harding & Cleanthes Israilides, Cogent Food & Agriculture (2016), 2: 1180950.

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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