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Can illness beliefs, from the common-sense model, prospectively predict adherence to self-management behaviours?: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Aujla, Navneet; Walker, Marion; Sprigg, Nikola; Abrams, Keith; Massey, Adam; Vedhara, Kavita

Can illness beliefs, from the common-sense model, prospectively predict adherence to self-management behaviours?: a systematic review and meta-analysis Thumbnail


Authors

Navneet Aujla

Marion Walker

NIKOLA SPRIGG nikola.sprigg@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Stroke Medicine

Keith Abrams

Adam Massey

Kavita Vedhara



Abstract

Objective: To determine whether people’s beliefs about their illness, conceptualised by the common sense model (CSM), can prospectively predict adherence to self-management behaviours (including, attendance, medication, diet and exercise) in adults with acute and chronic physical illnesses.

Design and Main Outcome Measures: Electronic databases were searched in September 2014, for papers specifying the use of the ‘CSM’ in relation to ‘self-management’, ‘rehabilitation’ and ‘adherence’ in the context of physical illness. Six hundred abstracts emerged. Data from 52 relevant studies were extracted. Twenty-one studies were meta-analysed, using correlation coefficients in random effects models. The remainder were descriptively synthesised.

Results: The effect sizes for individual illness belief domains and adherence to self-management behaviours ranged from .04 to .13, indicating very weak, predictive relationships. Further analysis revealed that predictive relationships did not differ by the: type of self-management behaviour; acute or chronic illness; or duration of follow-up.

Conclusion: Individual illness belief domains, outlined by the CSM, did not predict adherence to self-management behaviours in adults with physical illnesses. Prospective relationships, controlling for past behaviour, also did not emerge. Other factors, including patients’ treatment beliefs and inter-relationships between individual illness beliefs domains, may have influenced potential associations with adherence to self-management behaviours.

Citation

Aujla, N., Walker, M., Sprigg, N., Abrams, K., Massey, A., & Vedhara, K. (in press). Can illness beliefs, from the common-sense model, prospectively predict adherence to self-management behaviours?: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychology and Health, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2016.1153640

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Feb 7, 2016
Online Publication Date Mar 28, 2016
Deposit Date Apr 18, 2016
Publicly Available Date Apr 18, 2016
Journal Psychology & Health
Print ISSN 0887-0446
Electronic ISSN 1476-8321
Publisher Routledge
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 2016
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2016.1153640
Keywords illness beliefs, common sense model, self-regulation theory, self-management, adherence, systematic review
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/778883
Publisher URL http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08870446.2016.1153640
Additional Information This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology & Health on 28/03/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08870446.2016.1153640

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