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Postmission Altruistic Identity Disruption Questionnaire (PostAID/Q): identifying humanitarian-related distress during the reintegration period following international humanitarian aid work

McCormack, Lynne; Orenstein, Andrew; Joseph, Stephen

Postmission Altruistic Identity Disruption Questionnaire (PostAID/Q): identifying humanitarian-related distress during the reintegration period following international humanitarian aid work Thumbnail


Authors

Lynne McCormack

Andrew Orenstein



Abstract

Psychological care of humanitarian personnel exposed to high risk environments is not standardized across the sector. Particularly, returnees experiencing re-integration distress specific to prior aid deployment, is randomly addressed. The Postmission Altruistic Identity Disruption Questionnaire (PostAID/Q), an 18-item self-report screening tool, attempts to standardize assessment of re-integration/specific distress in returnees from humanitarian deployment. When individuals, high in altruistic identity (AI), perceive invalidation or lack of support from organization, family, or society following a difficult deployment, they may experience altruistic identity disruption (AID) manifest by interrelated feelings of isolation, doubt, and self-blame. Paradoxically, AID distress can precipitate attempts to redeploy prematurely leaving any prior adverse/traumatic responses unresolved. This study compared the discriminant validity of PostAID/Q with standardized measures of distress and social support (IES-R;GHQ-12;SPS). The construct demonstrated significant predictive value, high internal consistency and significant variance over and above the other constructs. Promisingly, PostAID/Q shows utility in predicting re-integration/specific distress postmission.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Sep 26, 2015
Publication Date Jan 18, 2016
Deposit Date Mar 23, 2016
Publicly Available Date Mar 23, 2016
Journal Traumatology
Print ISSN 1534-7656
Electronic ISSN 1085-9373
Publisher American Psychological Association
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 22
Issue 1
Pages 1-8
DOI https://doi.org/10.1037/trm0000053
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/772441
Publisher URL http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayrecord&uid=2016-02339-001
Additional Information This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

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