Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Smoking in the home after childbirth: prevalence and determinants in an English cohort

Orton, Sophie; Coleman, Tim; Jones, Laura L; Cooper, Sue; Lewis, Sarah

Authors

TIM COLEMAN tim.coleman@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Primary Care

Laura L Jones l.l.jones@bham.ac.uk



Abstract

Objectives

Children's exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is causally linked to childhood morbidity and mortality. Over 38% of English children (aged 4–15) whose parents are smokers are exposed to SHS in the home. Little is known about the prevalence of SHS exposure in the homes of young infants (≤3 months). This study aimed to estimate maternal self-reported prevalence of SHS exposure among infants of women who smoked just before or during pregnancy, and identify factors associated with exposure.

Setting

Primary Care, Nottingham, England.


Participants


Current and recent ex-smoking pregnant women (n=850) were recruited in Nottingham, England. Women completed questionnaires at 8–26 weeks gestation and 3 months after childbirth. Data on smoking in the home 3 months after childbirth was available for 471 households.Primary and secondary outcome measures Maternal-reported smoking in the home 3 months after childbirth.

Results

The prevalence of smoking in the home 3 months after childbirth was 16.3% (95% CI 13.2% to 19.8%) and after multiple imputation controlling for non-response 18.2% (95% CI 14.0% to 22.5%). 59% of mothers were current smokers; of these, 24% reported that smoking occurred in their home compared to 4.7% of non-smokers. In multivariable logistic regression, mothers smoking ≥11 cigarettes per day were 8.2 times (95% CI 3.4 to 19.6) more likely to report smoking in the home. Younger age, being of non-white ethnicity, increased deprivation and less negative attitudes towards SHS were also associated with smoking in the home.

Conclusions

This survey of smoking in the home 3 months after childbirth found a lower prevalence than has been reported in older children. Interventions to support smoking mothers to quit, or to help them restrict smoking in the home, should target attitudinal change and address inequality relating to social disadvantage, younger age and non-white ethnic groups.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Sep 8, 2015
Journal BMJ Open
Electronic ISSN 2044-6055
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 5
Issue 9
Article Number e008856
APA6 Citation Orton, S., Coleman, T., Jones, L. L., Cooper, S., & Lewis, S. (2015). Smoking in the home after childbirth: prevalence and determinants in an English cohort. BMJ Open, 5(9), doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008856
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008856
Publisher URL http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/9/e008856
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Files

BMJ Open-2015-Orton-.pdf (914 Kb)
PDF

Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





You might also like



Downloadable Citations

;