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Zinc-enriched fertilisers as a potential public health intervention in Africa

Joy, Edward J. M.; Stein, Alexander J.; Young, Scott D.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Broadley, Martin R.

Authors

Edward J. M. Joy

Alexander J. Stein

Scott D. Young scott.young@nottingham.ac.uk

Michael J. Watts



Abstract

Background

In this review, we examine the potential of Zn-enriched fertilisers to alleviate human dietary Zn deficiency. The focus is on ten African countries where dietary Zn supply is low and where fertiliser subsidies are routinely deployed on cereal crops.

Scope

Dietary Zn supply and deficiency prevalence were quantified from food supply and composition data. Typical effects of soil (granular) and foliar Zn applications on Zn concentrations in maize (Zea mays L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grains were based on a systematic literature review. Reductions in disease burdens attributable to Zn deficiency and cost-effectiveness were estimated using a disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) approach.

Conclusions

Baseline Zn supply in 2009 ranged from 7.1 (Zambia) to 11.9 (Mali) mg capita−1 day−1; prevalence of Zn deficiency ranged from 24 (Nigeria) to 66 % (Zambia). In reviewed studies, soil Zn application led to an increase in median Zn concentration in maize, rice and wheat grains of 23, 7 and 19 %; foliar application led to increases of 30, 25 and 63 %. Enriching granular fertilisers within current subsidy schemes would be most effective in Malawi, reducing DALYs lost due to Zn deficiency by 10 %. The cost per DALY saved ranged from US$ 624 to 5893 via granular fertilisers and from US$ 46 to 347 via foliar fertilisers. Foliar applications are likely to be more cost effective than soil applications due to fixation of Zn in the soil but may be more difficult to deploy. Zinc fertilisation is likely to be less cost-effective than breeding in the longer term although other micronutrients such as selenium could be incorporated.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2015-04
Journal Plant and Soil
Print ISSN 0032-079X
Electronic ISSN 1573-5036
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 389
Issue 1-2
Pages 1-24
APA6 Citation Joy, E. J. M., Stein, A. J., Young, S. D., Ander, E. L., Watts, M. J., & Broadley, M. R. (2015). Zinc-enriched fertilisers as a potential public health intervention in Africa. Plant and Soil, 389(1-2), 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2430-8
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2430-8
Keywords Agronomic biofortification; Fertiliser; HarvestPlus; Micronutrient deficiency; Phytic Acid; Zinc
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2430-8
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2430-8

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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