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Growing evidence of the interconnections between modern slavery, environmental degradation, and climate change

Decker Sparks, Jessica L.; Boyd, Doreen S.; Jackson, Bethany; Ives, Christopher D.; Bales, Kevin

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Authors

JESSICA SPARKS Jessica.Sparks@nottingham.ac.uk
Rights Lab Senior Research Fellow

DOREEN BOYD doreen.boyd@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Earth Observation

CHRIS IVES CHRIS.IVES@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Associate Professor

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KEVIN BALES Kevin.Bales@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Contemporary Slavery



Abstract

The modern slavery–environmental degradation–climate change nexus may threaten the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Globally, approximately 12.2 million workers are entrapped in modern slavery in environmentally degrading activities, and SDG target 8.7 (the elimination of all forms of modern slavery) may be instrumental in accelerating attainment of other SDG targets. However, without appropriate mitigation strategies, the attainment of some of the SDG's environmental targets may also negatively influence progress on 8.7. Unfortunately, these feedbacks are poorly understood and data are limited and difficult to obtain. In this perspective we show how an SDG interaction framework may help overcome these data challenges by signaling how potential policy action and other interventions would influence progress on 8.7 and other environmental targets based on known processes and patterns. This understanding is crucial to move beyond data limitations, direct future research, and develop an often-lacking evidence-base to effect holistic change.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jan 22, 2021
Online Publication Date Feb 19, 2021
Publication Date Feb 19, 2021
Deposit Date Jan 25, 2021
Publicly Available Date Feb 19, 2021
Journal One Earth
Electronic ISSN 2590-3322
Publisher Elsevier (Cell Press)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 4
Issue 2
Pages 181-191
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oneear.2021.01.015
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/5268533
Publisher URL https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2590332221000610