Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Modelling the impact of wastewater flows and management practices on antimicrobial resistance in dairy farms

Todman, Henry; Helliwell, Richard; King, Liz; Blanchard, Adam; Gray-Hammerton, Charlotte J.; Hooton, Steven P.; Baker, Michelle; Margerison, Jean; Wilson, Paul; Dodd, Christine E. R.; Morris, Carol; Raman, Sujatha; Hudson, Chris; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; Hobman, Jon L.; Kypraios, Theodore; Stekel, Dov J.

Modelling the impact of wastewater flows and management practices on antimicrobial resistance in dairy farms Thumbnail


Authors

Henry Todman

Richard Helliwell

LIZ KING Liz.King@nottingham.ac.uk
Research Fellow

Charlotte J. Gray-Hammerton

Steven P. Hooton

Profile Image

PAUL WILSON PAUL.WILSON@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Agricultural Economics

Christine E. R. Dodd

Sujatha Raman

CHRISTOPHER HUDSON chris.hudson@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Dairy Herd Health and Production

Jan-Ulrich Kreft

JON HOBMAN jon.hobman@nottingham.ac.uk
Associate Professor

DOV STEKEL DOV.STEKEL@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Computational Biology



Abstract

Dairy slurry is a major source of environmental contamination with antimicrobial resistant genes and bacteria. We developed mathematical models and conducted on-farm research to explore the impact of wastewater flows and management practices on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in slurry. Temporal fluctuations in cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli were observed and attributed to farm activities, specifically the disposal of spent copper and zinc footbath into the slurry system. Our model revealed that resistance should be more frequently observed with relevant determinants encoded chromosomally rather than on plasmids, which was supported by reanalysis of sequenced genomes from the farm. Additionally, lower resistance levels were predicted in conditions with lower growth and higher death rates. The use of muck heap effluent for washing dirty channels did not explain the fluctuations in cephalosporin resistance. These results highlight farm-specific opportunities to reduce AMR pollution, beyond antibiotic use reduction, including careful disposal or recycling of waste antimicrobial metals.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Feb 15, 2024
Online Publication Date May 14, 2024
Publication Date May 14, 2024
Deposit Date May 14, 2024
Publicly Available Date May 15, 2024
Journal npj Antimicrobials & Resistance
Publisher Springer Nature
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 2
Issue 1
Article Number 13
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s44259-024-00029-4
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/34859333
Publisher URL https://www.nature.com/articles/s44259-024-00029-4
Additional Information Received: 2 October 2023; Accepted: 15 February 2024; First Online: 14 May 2024; : The authors declare no competing interests.