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Alcohol Prevention in Urgent and Emergency Care (APUEC): Development and Evaluation of Workforce Digital Training on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral for Treatment

Blake, Holly; Adams, Emma J.; Chaplin, Wendy J.; Morris, Lucy; Mahmood, Ikra; Taylor, Michael G.; Langmack, Gillian; Jones, Lydia; Miller, Philip; Coffey, Frank

Alcohol Prevention in Urgent and Emergency Care (APUEC): Development and Evaluation of Workforce Digital Training on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral for Treatment Thumbnail


Authors

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HOLLY BLAKE holly.blake@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Behavioural Medicine

Lucy Morris

Ikra Mahmood

Michael G. Taylor

Lydia Jones

Philip Miller

FRANK COFFEY frank.coffey@nottingham.ac.uk
Clinical Consultant To The Postgraduate Clinical Skills Prog



Abstract

Excessive alcohol consumption carries a significant health, social and economic burden. Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is one approach to identifying patients with excessive alcohol consumption and providing interventions to help them reduce their drinking. However, healthcare workers in urgent and emergency care settings do not routinely integrate SBIRT into clinical practice and raise a lack of training as a barrier to SBIRT delivery. Therefore, “Alcohol Prevention in Urgent and Emergency Care” (APUEC) training was developed, delivered, and evaluated. APUEC is a brief, stand-alone, multimedia, interactive digital training package for healthcare workers. The aim of APUEC is to increase positive attitudes, knowledge, confidence and skills related to SBIRT through the provision of (a) education on the impact of alcohol and the role of urgent and emergency care in alcohol prevention, and (b) practical guidance on patient assessment, delivery of brief advice and making referral decisions. Development involved collaborative–participatory design approaches and a rigorous six-step ASPIRE methodology (involving n = 28 contributors). APUEC was delivered to healthcare workers who completed an online survey (n = 18) and then participated in individual qualitative interviews (n = 15). Analysis of data was aligned with Levels 1–3 of the Kirkpatrick Model of Training Evaluation. Survey data showed that all participants (100%) found the training useful and would recommend it to others. Insights from the qualitative data showed that APUEC digital training increases healthcare workers’ perceived knowledge, confidence and skills related to alcohol prevention in urgent and emergency care settings. Participants viewed APUEC to be engaging and relevant to urgent and emergency care workers. This digital training was perceived to be useful for workforce skills development and supporting the implementation of SBIRT in clinical practice. While the impact of APUEC on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes is yet to be tested, APUEC digital training could easily be embedded within education and continuing professional development programmes for healthcare workers and healthcare trainees of any discipline. Ultimately, this may facilitate the integration of SBIRT into routine care and contribute to population health improvement.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Nov 2, 2023
Online Publication Date Nov 7, 2023
Publication Date Nov 7, 2023
Deposit Date Nov 6, 2023
Publicly Available Date Nov 7, 2023
Journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Print ISSN 1661-7827
Electronic ISSN 1660-4601
Publisher MDPI
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 20
Issue 22
Article Number 7028
DOI https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20227028
Keywords Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis, Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/27072811
Publisher URL https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/20/22/7028

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