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An analysis of endocannabinoid concentrations and mood following singing and exercise in healthy volunteers

Stone, Nicole L.; Millar, Sophie A.; Herrod, Philip J. J.; Barrett, David A.; Ortori, Catharine A.; Mellon, Valerie A.; O’Sullivan, Saoirse E.

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Authors

Nicole L. Stone

Sophie A. Millar

Philip J. J. Herrod

David A. Barrett

Catharine A. Ortori

Valerie A. Mellon

Saoirse E. O’Sullivan



Abstract

© 2018 Stone, Millar, Herrod, Barrett, Ortori, Mellon and O’Sullivan. The euphoric feeling described after running is, at least in part, due to increased circulating endocannabinoids (eCBs). eCBs are lipid signaling molecules involved in reward, appetite, mood, memory and neuroprotection. The aim of this study was to investigate whether activities other than running can increase circulating eCBs. Nine healthy female volunteers (mean 61 years) were recruited from a local choir. Circulating eCBs, haemodynamics, mood and hunger ratings were measured before and immediately after 30 min of dance, reading, singing or cycling in a fasted state. Singing increased plasma levels of anandamide (AEA) by 42% (P < 0.05), palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) by 53% (P < 0.01) and oleoylethanolamine (OEA) by 34% (P < 0.05) and improved positive mood and emotions (P < 0.01), without affecting hunger scores. Dancing did not affect eCB levels or hunger ratings, but decreased negative mood and emotions (P < 0.01). Cycling increased OEA levels by 26% (P < 0.05) and tended to decrease how hungry volunteers felt, without affecting mood. Reading increased OEA levels by 28% (P < 0.01) and increased the desire to eat. Plasma AEA levels were positively correlated with how full participants felt (P < 0.05). Plasma OEA levels were positively correlated with positive mood and emotions (P < 0.01). All three ethanolamines were positively correlated with heart rate (HR; P < 0.0001). These data suggest that activities other than running can increase plasma eCBs associated with changes in mood or appetite. Increases in eCBs may underlie the rewarding and pleasurable effects of singing and exercise and ultimately some of the long-term beneficial effects on mental health, cognition and memory.

Citation

Stone, N. L., Millar, S. A., Herrod, P. J. J., Barrett, D. A., Ortori, C. A., Mellon, V. A., & O’Sullivan, S. E. (2018). An analysis of endocannabinoid concentrations and mood following singing and exercise in healthy volunteers. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 12, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00269

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Oct 22, 2018
Online Publication Date Nov 26, 2018
Publication Date Nov 26, 2018
Deposit Date Jan 7, 2019
Publicly Available Date Jan 7, 2019
Journal Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Electronic ISSN 1662-5153
Publisher Frontiers Media
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 12
Article Number 269
Pages 1-10
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00269
Keywords Cognitive Neuroscience; Behavioral Neuroscience; Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1446658
Publisher URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00269/full

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