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Systematic review and citation content analysis of the CHIME framework for mental health recovery processes: recommendations for developing influential conceptual frameworks

Hare-Duke, Laurie; Charles, Ashleigh; Slade, Mike; Rennick-Egglestone, Stefan; Dys, Ada; Bijdevaate, Daan

Systematic review and citation content analysis of the CHIME framework for mental health recovery processes: recommendations for developing influential conceptual frameworks Thumbnail


Authors

Laurie Hare-Duke

Ashleigh Charles

MIKE SLADE M.SLADE@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Mental Health Recovery and Social Inclusion

Ada Dys

Daan Bijdevaate



Abstract

Objectives

To identify design features of the CHIME conceptual framework of mental health recovery which are associated with high rates of citation.

Research Design and Methods

Systematic review of all citations of the Connectedness, Hope, Identity, Meaning, and Empowerment (CHIME) framework of mental health recovery. Papers citing CHIME were screened and extracted from three citation databases. Citation content analysis was used to investigate associations between nine CHIME design features. Citations were investigated across six forms of visibility: all citations; Anglophone vs non-Anglophone; academic vs non-academic; academic discipline; professional group; and clinical population.

Results

There were 915 eligible documents identified. Six CHIME framework design features met predefined thresholds for high levels of influence: (i) using a systematic review methodology for development, (ii) adopting a memorable acronym, (iii) having disagreeable components, and being unaligned to a (iv) particular discipline (i.e., transdisciplinary), (v) professional group, or (vi) diagnostic population. Documents from Anglophone countries were more likely to cite CHIME with reference to trans-professional (χ2=3.96, df=1, p=0.05) and ethnicity sub-group analysis (p=0.039) design features than non-Anglophone documents. Non-academic documents were more likely to cite the acronym design feature than academic papers (χ2=5.73, df=1, p=0.01). Public Health-related publications were more likely to cite CHIME within a trans-diagnostic framework (χ2=16.39, df=1, p<0.001) than other disciplines.

Conclusions

The influence and impact of conceptual frameworks for recovery are increased when the framework is underpinned by a systematic review, includes disagreeable components which can be summarized using a memorable acronym, and when the framework is transdisciplinary, trans-professional, and trans-diagnostic.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Nov 23, 2022
Online Publication Date Jan 6, 2023
Publication Date Jan 6, 2023
Deposit Date Nov 23, 2022
Publicly Available Date Nov 24, 2022
Journal Journal of Recovery in Mental Health
Print ISSN 2371 - 2376
Publisher University of Toronto Libraries - UOTL
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 6
Issue 1
Pages 38-44
DOI https://doi.org/10.33137/jrmh.v6i1.38556
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/14034379
Publisher URL https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/rmh/article/view/38556
Additional Information Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.

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