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Am I still not a man and a brother?: protest memory in contemporary antislavery visual culture

Trodd, Zoe

Authors

Zoe Trodd



Abstract

This article examines the visual culture of the twenty-first century antislavery movement,
arguing that it adapts four main icons of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century abolitionism
for its contemporary campaigns against global slavery and human trafficking: the ‘Am I
Not a Man and a Brother’ icon, the diagram of the ‘Brookes’ slave ship, the ‘Scourged
Back’ photograph and the auction-block detail from the Liberator masthead. Finding
some of the same limitations of paternalism, dehumanisation and sensationalism as
dominated much of the first antislavery movement’s visual culture, the article nonetheless
identifies a liberatory aesthetic and a protest memory in the antislavery imagery of several
contemporary artists, including Charles Campbell and Romuald Hazoume`.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date May 1, 2013
Journal Slavery and Abolition
Print ISSN 0144-039X
Electronic ISSN 1743-9523
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 34
Issue 2
APA6 Citation Trodd, Z. (2013). Am I still not a man and a brother?: protest memory in contemporary antislavery visual culture. Slavery and Abolition, 34(2), doi:10.1080/0144039X.2013.791172
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/0144039X.2013.791172
Publisher URL http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144039X.2013.791172
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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