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Health technologies ‘In the wild’: experiences of engagement with computerised CBT

Rennick-Egglestone, Stefan; Knowles, Sarah; Toms, Gill; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina; Bower, Peter

Authors

Sarah Knowles sarah.knowles@man.ac.uk

Gill Toms gill.toms@gmail.com

Penny Bee penny.bee@man.ac.uk

Karina Lovell karina.lovell@man.ac.uk

Peter Bower peter.bower@man.ac.uk



Abstract

The widespread deployment of technology by professional health services will provide a substantial opportunity for studies that consider usage in naturalistic settings. Our study has documented experiences of engaging with technologies intended to support recovery from common mental health problems, often used as a part of a multi-year recovery process. In analyzing this material, we identify issues of broad interest to effective health technology design, and reflect on the challenge of studying engagement with health technologies over lengthy time periods. We also consider the importance of designing technologies that are sensitive to the needs of users experiencing chronic health problems, and discuss how the term sensitivity might be defined in a technology design context.

Citation

Rennick-Egglestone, S., Knowles, S., Toms, G., Bee, P., Lovell, K., & Bower, P. (2016). Health technologies ‘In the wild’: experiences of engagement with computerised CBT. doi:10.1145/2858036.2858128

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date May 7, 2016
Deposit Date Jan 19, 2016
Publicly Available Date May 7, 2016
Journal CHI'16 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858128
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/31286
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858128
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information CHI'16 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 7-12 May 2016, San Jose, California, USA. New York : ACM. ISBN 978-1-4503-3362-7.

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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