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Social music machine: crowdsourcing for composition & creativity

Chamberlain, Alan; De Roure, David; Willcox, Pip

Authors

Alan Chamberlain alan.chamberlain@nottingham.ac.uk

David De Roure

Pip Willcox



Abstract

This poster describes a compositional technique that used crowd-sourced midi clips in order to develop a piece of music, which was later performed. This work in progress highlighted some of the issues facing the designers of systems that enable the ‘crowd’ to compose.

INTRODUCTION
Can the crowd get creative? And what sort of tools might be used to support this? These are the sorts of questions that we thought about when we initially started to think about these problems. Using software originally developed as part of an Experimental Digital Humanities [1] project, we started to wonder about how such software - “Numbers into Notes” [2] might work in the real world if multiple people used it in creative way, and what lessons might we learn from carrying out such an intervention.

Publication Date Dec 19, 2017
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
APA6 Citation Chamberlain, A., De Roure, D., & Willcox, P. (2017). Social music machine: crowdsourcing for composition & creativity
Keywords Crowdsourcing, HCI, Creativity, Music, Composition, Performance, Interaction, Social machine
Related Public URLs http://c4dm.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp12/
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf
Additional Information Published in: DMRN+12: Digital Music Research Network One-Day Workshop 2017, Tuesday 19th December 2017. Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London.

Files

Crowd DMRN2017.pdf (290 Kb)
PDF

Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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