Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Primordial germ cells: the first cell lineage or the last cells standing?

Johnson, Andrew D.; Alberio, Ramiro

Authors

Andrew D. Johnson

RAMIRO ALBERIO ramiro.alberio@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Developmental Biology



Abstract

Embryos of many animal models express germ line determinants that suppress transcription and mediate early germ line commitment, which occurs before the somatic cell lineages are established. However, not all animals segregate their germ line in this manner. The ‘last cell standing’ model describes primordial germ cell (PGC) development in axolotls, in which PGCs are maintained by an extracellular signalling niche, and germ line commitment occurs after gastrulation. Here, we propose that this ‘stochastic’ mode of PGC specification is conserved in vertebrates, including non-rodent mammals. We postulate that early germ line segregation liberates genetic regulatory networks for somatic development to evolve, and that it therefore emerged repeatedly in the animal kingdom in response to natural selection.

Citation

Johnson, A. D., & Alberio, R. (in press). Primordial germ cells: the first cell lineage or the last cells standing?. Development, 142, https://doi.org/10.1242/dev.113993

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Aug 3, 2015
Online Publication Date Aug 18, 2015
Deposit Date Sep 22, 2016
Publicly Available Date Sep 22, 2016
Journal Development
Print ISSN 0950-1991
Electronic ISSN 1477-9129
Publisher Company of Biologists
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 142
DOI https://doi.org/10.1242/dev.113993
Keywords Amphibian embryo, Evolvability, Germ plasm, Mammalian embryo, Pluripotency, Primordial germ cell, PGC
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/37066
Publisher URL http://dev.biologists.org/content/142/16/2730
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Files


Development-2015-Johnson-2730-9.pdf (1.5 Mb)
PDF

Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





You might also like



Downloadable Citations