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Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment

Foster, Claire; Breckons, Matthew; Cotterell, P.; Barbosa, D.; Calman, Lynn; Corner, Jessica; Fenlon, Deborah; Foster, R.; Grimmett, Chloe; Richardson, Alison; Smith, P.W.

Authors

Claire Foster

Matthew Breckons

P. Cotterell

D. Barbosa

Lynn Calman

Deborah Fenlon

R. Foster

Chloe Grimmett

Alison Richardson

P.W. Smith



Abstract

PURPOSE
Cancer survivors are increasingly expected to manage the consequences of cancer and its treatment for themselves. There is evidence that self-efficacy is important for successful self-management and that this can be enhanced with support. The purpose of this study was to assess self-efficacy to manage problems in the year following primary treatment.

METHODS

This cross-sectional online survey included cancer survivors who had completed their treatment within the past 12 months. Self-efficacy was assessed and variables expected to be associated with self-efficacy were measured using validated scales including quality of life, well-being, illness perceptions, depression and social support.

RESULTS
One hundred eighty-two respondents (mean age 50; 81 % female) completed the survey. They had been treated for a range of cancers; most commonly breast (45 %). Self-efficacy scores varied between individuals and according to the illness-related task to be managed. Respondents were least confident in managing fatigue and most confident in accessing information about their cancer. Individuals most likely to report low self-efficacy were women, those experiencing higher levels of pain and/or depression, lower well-being scores, lower socio-economic status, low levels of social support, or a more negative perception of cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-efficacy to self-manage problems faced as a consequence of cancer and its treatment can vary widely in the year following treatment. Fatigue may be particularly difficult to manage.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS
Variations in self-efficacy highlight the importance of assessing specific problems faced and people's confidence to manage them in order to tailor appropriate self-management support.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jul 16, 2014
Journal Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Print ISSN 1932-2259
Electronic ISSN 1932-2267
Publisher Humana Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 9
Issue 1
APA6 Citation Foster, C., Breckons, M., Cotterell, P., Barbosa, D., Calman, L., Corner, J., …Smith, P. (2014). Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 9(1), doi:10.1007/s11764-014-0384-0
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-014-0384-0
Keywords self-management, cancer survivors, self-efficacy, confidence, neoplasms
Publisher URL http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11764-014-0384-0
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Foster Online survey J Cancer Survivorship 2014.pdf (541 Kb)
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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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