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Adenosine-A3 receptors in neutrophil microdomains promote the formation of bacteria-tethering cytonemes

Corriden, Ross; Self, Tim; Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Nizet, Victor; Kellam, Barrie; Briddon, Stephen J.; Hill, Stephen J.

Authors

Ross Corriden

Tim Self

Kathryn Akong-Moore

Victor Nizet

Barrie Kellam

Stephen J. Briddon

Stephen J. Hill

Abstract

The A3‐adenosine receptor (A3AR) has recently emerged as a key regulator of neutrophil behaviour. Using a fluorescent A3AR ligand, we show that A3ARs aggregate in highly polarized immunomodulatory microdomains on human neutrophil membranes. In addition to regulating chemotaxis, A3ARs promote the formation of filipodia‐like projections (cytonemes) that can extend up to 100 μm to tether and ‘reel in’ pathogens. Exposure to bacteria or an A3AR agonist stimulates the formation of these projections and bacterial phagocytosis, whereas an A3AR‐selective antagonist inhibits cytoneme formation. Our results shed new light on the behaviour of neutrophils and identify the A3AR as a potential target for modulating their function.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jul 2, 2013
Journal EMBO reports
Print ISSN 1469-221X
Electronic ISSN 1469-221X
Publisher EMBO Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 14
Issue 8
Institution Citation Corriden, R., Self, T., Akong-Moore, K., Nizet, V., Kellam, B., Briddon, S. J., & Hill, S. J. (2013). Adenosine-A3 receptors in neutrophil microdomains promote the formation of bacteria-tethering cytonemes. EMBO Reports, 14(8), doi:10.1038/embor.2013.89
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/embor.2013.89
Publisher URL http://embor.embopress.org/content/14/8/726
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0




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