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Northward shift of the southern westerlies during the Antarctic Cold Reversal

Fletcher, Michael-Shawn; Pedro, Joel; Hall, Tegan; Mariani, Michela; Joseph, Alexander; Beck, Kristen; Blaauw, Maarten; Hodgson, Dominic; Heijnis, Henk; Gadd, Patricia; Lise-Pronovost, Agathe

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Authors

Michael-Shawn Fletcher

Joel Pedro

Tegan Hall

Alexander Joseph

Kristen Beck

Maarten Blaauw

Dominic Hodgson

Henk Heijnis

Patricia Gadd

Agathe Lise-Pronovost



Abstract

Inter-hemispheric asynchrony of climate change through the last deglaciation has been theoretically linked to latitudinal shifts in the southern westerlies via their influence over CO2 out-gassing from the Southern Ocean. Proxy-based reconstructions disagree on the behaviour of the westerlies through this interval. The last deglaciation was interrupted in the Southern Hemisphere by the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR; 14.7 to 13.0 ka BP (thousand years Before Present)), a millennial-scale cooling event that coincided with the Bølling–Allerød warm phase in the North Atlantic (BA; 14.7 to 12.7 ka BP). We present terrestrial proxy palaeoclimate data that demonstrate a migration of the westerlies during the last deglaciation. We support the hypothesis that wind-driven out-gassing of old CO2 from the Southern Ocean drove the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Sep 5, 2021
Online Publication Date Sep 23, 2021
Publication Date Nov 1, 2021
Deposit Date Sep 22, 2021
Publicly Available Date Sep 24, 2022
Journal Quaternary Science Reviews
Print ISSN 0277-3791
Publisher Elsevier BV
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 271
Article Number 107189
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2021.107189
Keywords Geology; Archeology; Archeology; Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics; Global and Planetary Change
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/6296098
Publisher URL https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277379121003966

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