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Mixed-methods systematic review: Childbearing women's views, experiences, and decision-making related to epidural analgesia in labour

Borrelli, Sara; Evans, Kerry; Pallotti, Phoebe; Evans, Catrin; Eldridge, Jeanette; Spiby, Helen

Authors

Phoebe Pallotti

Dr CATRIN EVANS CATRIN.EVANS@NOTTINGHAM.AC.UK
Professor of Evidence Based Healthcare

Jeanette Eldridge



Abstract

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims: To investigate childbearing women's views, experiences and decision-making related to epidural analgesia in labour. Design: Mixed-methods systematic review. Data Sources: A comprehensive literature search was implemented across Medline, CINAHL and EMBASE from 2000 to September 2018. The literature search was undertaken in January 2018 and updated in September 2018. Thirty papers were selected. Results: Four overarching synthesized findings were identified: (a) choice; (b) pain management experience; (c) lack of information; and (d) information provision and consent. Review Methods: Quality appraisal was conducted using JBI levels of evidence and other established tools. NVivo was used to independently dual code and thematically synthesize qualitative data. A narrative synthesis of the quantitative findings from the included studies was undertaken. The GRADE-CERQual approach was used to assess confidence in the review findings based on the qualitative data. A set of integrated mixed-methods synthesized findings was produced. Conclusion: Recommendations for practice based on the systematic review findings are that midwives should dedicate time to discuss epidural with women and birth partners, ideally during the second or third trimester of pregnancy, asking women what coping strategies or pain relief they have been considering, if any. The factors which may influence the woman's choice of epidural, including pain threshold, ability to cope with pain, timing of epidural and length of labour should be continuously evaluated during labour. The midwife should remain with women after an epidural has been sited, demonstrating understanding of the woman's choice and providing an opportunity for discussion of plans for the remaining labour and birth. Impact: The findings of this systematic review can inform both healthcare professionals and service users on various aspects of the decision-making process about the use of epidural analgesia in labour. Data can be transferable to similar settings in high-income countries.

Citation

Borrelli, S., Evans, K., Pallotti, P., Evans, C., Eldridge, J., & Spiby, H. (2020). Mixed-methods systematic review: Childbearing women's views, experiences, and decision-making related to epidural analgesia in labour. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(12), 3273-3292. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14555

Journal Article Type Review
Acceptance Date Aug 10, 2020
Online Publication Date Sep 29, 2020
Publication Date 2020-12
Deposit Date Dec 10, 2020
Publicly Available Date Sep 30, 2021
Journal Journal of Advanced Nursing
Print ISSN 0309-2402
Electronic ISSN 1365-2648
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 76
Issue 12
Pages 3273-3292
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14555
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/4938253
Publisher URL https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jan.14555
Additional Information This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Borrelli, S., Evans, K., Pallotti, P., Evans, C., Eldridge, J., & Spiby, H. (2020). Mixed-methods systematic review: Childbearing women's views, experiences, and decision-making related to epidural analgesia in labour. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(12), 3273-3292, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14555. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions

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