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Pedagogical devices as children’s social care levers: A study of social care workers’ attitudes towards boarding schools to care for and educate children in need

Murphy, David; Oliver, Mary; Pourhabib, Sanam; Adkins, Michael; Hodgen, Jeremy

Authors

MARY OLIVER Mary.Oliver@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Science Education

Sanam Pourhabib

Jeremy Hodgen



Abstract

It has been proposed that boarding schools in England can be used to provide a stable education and care environment for vulnerable children in need and the government is expanding their use. However, for vulnerable children to be placed in boarding schools social workers will need to be willing to contemplate the boarding as a viable care option. In this study we interviewed (N=21) social care practitioners including Directors, senior and middle managers, frontline social workers, social worker-academics and family support workers who work with vulnerable children. Using thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews, seven major themes identified a range of issues and concerns held by social care workers about placing vulnerable children in boarding schools. We present these themes and consider the issues that will have to be addressed prior to changes in policy and practice. The study concludes that many of those within the social work profession are unlikely to consider boarding as an intervention for children in need. Further research in this area is a matter of urgency.

Citation

Murphy, D., Oliver, M., Pourhabib, S., Adkins, M., & Hodgen, J. (2020). Pedagogical devices as children’s social care levers: A study of social care workers’ attitudes towards boarding schools to care for and educate children in need. British Educational Research Journal, https://doi.org/10.1002/berj.3633

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Apr 20, 2020
Online Publication Date May 19, 2020
Publication Date May 19, 2020
Deposit Date Jul 6, 2020
Publicly Available Date Jul 13, 2020
Journal British Educational Research Journal
Print ISSN 0141-1926
Electronic ISSN 1469-3518
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/berj.3633
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/4356015
Publisher URL https://bera-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/berj.3633

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berj.3633 (210 Kb)
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Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/





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