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Barriers and facilitators in providing home-based rehabilitation for stroke survivors with severe disability in the UK: an online focus group study with multidisciplinary rehabilitation teams

Fisher, Rebecca; Russell, Lal; Riley-Bennett, Frances; Cameron, Trudi; Walker, Marion; Sackley, Cath

Barriers and facilitators in providing home-based rehabilitation for stroke survivors with severe disability in the UK: an online focus group study with multidisciplinary rehabilitation teams Thumbnail


Authors

Rebecca Fisher

Frances Riley-Bennett

Marion Walker

Cath Sackley



Abstract

Objectives: In the UK, over 20% of stroke survivors leave hospital with severe disability. Limited evidence-based clinical guidance is available to support the rehabilitation of these individuals. Our previous research has focussed on establishing consensus regarding the core components of home-based rehabilitation for this under investigated group. This study explores the barriers of providing rehabilitation and identifies strategies to overcome them.

Design: Three focus group interviews were conducted with n=20. The Context Coding Framework was employed to organise the transcribed data and to facilitate inductive and deductive analysis and synthesis.

Setting: Online, MSTeams™, UK

Participants: A purposive sample of 20 NHS clinical staff participants, from three multidisciplinary teams providing home-based stroke rehabilitation for this population (n=7, 6 and 7).

Results: High levels of need were reported across multiple domains for survivors including continence, communication and physical function. Interventions often required multiagency collaboration in order to optimise the available resources and specialist skills. There was lack of clarity regarding who was ultimately responsible for providing components of rehabilitation for stroke survivors with severe disability. Teams provide rehabilitation for this population but are insufficiently commissioned or resourced to fully meet their needs. Incomplete and disjointed pathways with resultant healthcare inequalities were commonly reported. Teams used a variety of strategies to overcome these barriers and optimise rehabilitation opportunities. These included upskilling a diverse range of partners to capitalise on the skills and resources across health, social care and voluntary sector boundaries employing multi-agency collaboration. Teams established and engaged networks of stakeholders in order to advocate on behalf of stroke survivors.

Conclusions: Collaboration and partnership working is important in the delivery of rehabilitation for stroke survivors with severe disability. Commissioners need to be aware that cross-agency multidisciplinary expertise is required, if rehabilitation opportunities are to be realised and existing health inequalities addressed.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jun 5, 2023
Online Publication Date Aug 2, 2023
Publication Date Aug 2, 2023
Deposit Date Jun 13, 2023
Publicly Available Date Aug 2, 2023
Journal BMJ Open
Electronic ISSN 2044-6055
Publisher BMJ
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 13
Issue 8
Article Number e071217
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2022-071217
Keywords stroke medicine, stroke, rehabilitation medicine
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/21906638
Publisher URL https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/13/8/e071217