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The benefits of international volunteering in a low-resource setting: development of a core outcome set

Tyler, Natasha; Chatwin, John; Byrne, Ged; Hart, Jo; Byrne-Davis, Lucie

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Authors

Natasha Tyler

John Chatwin

Ged Byrne

Jo Hart

Lucie Byrne-Davis



Abstract

Background: Qualitative narrative analysis and case studies form the majority of the current peer-reviewed literature about the benefits of professional volunteering or international placements for healthcare professionals. These often describe generalised outcomes that are difficult to define or have multiple meanings (such as 'communication skills' or 'leadership') and are therefore difficult to measure. However, there is an interest from employers, professional groups and individual volunteers in generating metrics for monitoring personal and professional development of volunteers and comparing different volunteering experiences in terms of their impact on the volunteers. In this paper, we describe two studies in which we (a) consolidated qualitative research and individual accounts into a core outcome set and (b) tested the core outcome set in a large group of global health stakeholders. Method: We conducted a systematic review and meta-synthesis of literature to extract outcomes of international placements and variables that may affect these outcomes. We presented these outcomes to 58 stakeholders in global health, employing a Delphi method to reach consensus about which were 'core' and which were likely to be developed through international volunteering.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Nov 8, 2018
Online Publication Date Dec 20, 2018
Publication Date Dec 20, 2018
Deposit Date Jan 15, 2019
Publicly Available Date Jan 15, 2019
Journal Human Resources for Health
Electronic ISSN 1478-4491
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 16
Issue 1
Article Number 69
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0333-5
Keywords Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health; Public Administration
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1471956
Publisher URL https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12960-018-0333-5

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