Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

Drake, Robert A.R.; Hulse, Richard P.; Lumb, Bridget M.; Donaldson, Lucy F.

Authors

Robert A.R. Drake

Richard P. Hulse

Bridget M. Lumb

LUCY DONALDSON Lucy.Donaldson@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor of Sensory Physiology



Abstract

Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting 72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Aug 15, 2014
Journal The Journal of Physiology
Print ISSN 0022-3751
Electronic ISSN 1469-7793
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 592
Issue 16
Pages 3611-3624
APA6 Citation Drake, R. A., Hulse, R. P., Lumb, B. M., & Donaldson, L. F. (2014). The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input. Journal of Physiology, 592(16), 3611-3624. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.266494
DOI https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.266494
Publisher URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.266494/abstract
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Files

Drake_et_al-2014-The_Journal_of_Physiology.pdf (747 Kb)
PDF

Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





You might also like



Downloadable Citations

;