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Outputs (8)

Clinical academics' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative study of challenges and opportunities when working at the clinical frontline (2023)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Rowley, E., & Bramley, L. (2023). Clinical academics' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative study of challenges and opportunities when working at the clinical frontline. BMJ Leader, 7(4), 266-272. https://doi.org/10.1136/leader-2020-000414

Objectives: This study explored the experiences of clinical academics during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim was to identify challenges and benefits associated with returning to, or increasing hours at, the clinical frontline. Design: Qualitative data... Read More about Clinical academics' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative study of challenges and opportunities when working at the clinical frontline.

Anticipating, experiencing and overcoming challenges in clinical academic training (2021)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Barratt, J., & Rowley, E. (2021). Anticipating, experiencing and overcoming challenges in clinical academic training. British Journal of Healthcare Management, 27(8), https://doi.org/10.12968/bjhc.2020.0135

Background This paper builds on studies that have reported on the challenges of pursuing a clinical academic career. Aims This study aims to explore the perceived challenges clinical academic trainees experience, and the ways in which they overc... Read More about Anticipating, experiencing and overcoming challenges in clinical academic training.

Multimethods study comparing the experiences of medical clinical academics with nurses, midwives and allied health professionals pursuing a clinical academic career (2021)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Rowley, E., & Barratt, J. (2021). Multimethods study comparing the experiences of medical clinical academics with nurses, midwives and allied health professionals pursuing a clinical academic career. BMJ Open, 11(4), Article e043270. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-043270

Objectives: This study aimed to compare experiences of medical clinical academics (MCAs) with those of nurses, midwives, and allied health professionals (NMAHPs) pursuing a clinical academic career. Design: A multi-methods approach was used to elici... Read More about Multimethods study comparing the experiences of medical clinical academics with nurses, midwives and allied health professionals pursuing a clinical academic career.

Reflexive Self-Identity and Work: Working Women, Biographical Disruption and Agency (2020)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Trusson, C., & Casey, C. (2020). Reflexive Self-Identity and Work: Working Women, Biographical Disruption and Agency. Work, Employment and Society, https://doi.org/10.1177/0950017020926441

The article examines how women workers reflexively shape their self-identities and work identities following a significant biographical disruption incurred by breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Based on interviews with 22 women navigating their p... Read More about Reflexive Self-Identity and Work: Working Women, Biographical Disruption and Agency.

A mixed-methods study of challenges and benefits of clinical academic careers for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals (2019)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Rowley, E., & Bramley, L. (2019). A mixed-methods study of challenges and benefits of clinical academic careers for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals. BMJ Open, 9(10), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030595

Objectives: The clinical academic trajectory for doctors and dentists is well-established, with research embedded in their career development. Recent years have also seen a burgeoning interest and push for nurses, midwives and allied health professio... Read More about A mixed-methods study of challenges and benefits of clinical academic careers for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals.

Between stigma and pink positivity: women’s perceptions of social interactions during and after breast cancer treatment (2016)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., & Pilnick, A. (2017). Between stigma and pink positivity: women’s perceptions of social interactions during and after breast cancer treatment. Sociology of Health and Illness, 39(3), 458-473. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.12486

This study explores women’s perceptions of social interaction during and after their treatment for early stage breast cancer. Analysis of interviews with 24 women between 6 months-29 years post-diagnosis, reveals that interactions can be influenced b... Read More about Between stigma and pink positivity: women’s perceptions of social interactions during and after breast cancer treatment.

The Role of Hair Loss in Cancer Identity: Perceptions of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia Among Women Treated for Early-Stage Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (2016)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., & Pilnick, A. (2017). The Role of Hair Loss in Cancer Identity: Perceptions of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia Among Women Treated for Early-Stage Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ. Cancer Nursing, 40(2), E9–E16. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000373

Background: The trauma of chemotherapy-induced alopecia is well documented. However, less is known about how the stereotypical cancer identity affects social interactions. Objective: The aim of this study is to explore women's experiences of hair... Read More about The Role of Hair Loss in Cancer Identity: Perceptions of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia Among Women Treated for Early-Stage Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ.

A new normal?: Women's experiences of biographical disruption and liminality following treatment for early stage breast cancer (2016)
Journal Article
Trusson, D., Pilnick, A., & Roy, S. (2016). A new normal?: Women's experiences of biographical disruption and liminality following treatment for early stage breast cancer. Social Science and Medicine, 151, 121-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.011

Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, but little is known about the long-term implications of having survived a life-threatening illness and living with embodied reminders of its potential to return. Twenty-four women aged between... Read More about A new normal?: Women's experiences of biographical disruption and liminality following treatment for early stage breast cancer.