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Effects of task complexity and sensory conflict on goal-directed movement (2009)
Journal Article
Serrien, D. J., & Spapé, M. M. (2009). Effects of task complexity and sensory conflict on goal-directed movement. Neuroscience Letters, 464(1), doi:10.1016/j.neulet.2009.08.022

Interactions between brain regions are necessary for compound activities to take place. Accordingly, evaluating hemispheric information processing during skilled behaviour provides valuable knowledge about brain regulation. To this end, the present s... Read More about Effects of task complexity and sensory conflict on goal-directed movement.

The role of hand dominance and sensorimotor congruence in voluntary movement (2009)
Journal Article
Serrien, D. J., & Spapé, M. M. (2009). The role of hand dominance and sensorimotor congruence in voluntary movement. Experimental Brain Research, 199(2), doi:10.1007/s00221-009-1998-8

The present study evaluated the neural changes due to effector use (unimanual left, unimanual right, bimanual) and visuomotor conflict induced by mirror-reversed vision during drawing behaviour. EEG phase synchronization, expressing interregional com... Read More about The role of hand dominance and sensorimotor congruence in voluntary movement.

Go or no-go? Developmental improvements in the efficiency of response inhibition in mid-childhood (2008)
Journal Article
Cragg, L., & Nation, K. (2008). Go or no-go? Developmental improvements in the efficiency of response inhibition in mid-childhood. Developmental Science, 11(6), doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00730.x

This experiment used a modified go/no-go paradigm to investigate the processes by which response inhibition becomes more efficient during mid-childhood. The novel task, which measured trials on which a response was initiated but not completed, was se... Read More about Go or no-go? Developmental improvements in the efficiency of response inhibition in mid-childhood.

Centrifugal propagation of motion adaptation effects across visual space (2008)
Journal Article
McGraw, P. V., & Roach, N. W. (2008). Centrifugal propagation of motion adaptation effects across visual space. Journal of Vision, 8(11), doi:10.1167/8.11.1

Perceptual distortions induced by adaptation (aftereffects) arise through selective changes in the response properties of discrete subpopulations of neurons tuned to particular image features at the adapted spatial location. The systematic and well-d... Read More about Centrifugal propagation of motion adaptation effects across visual space.

Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) (2008)
Journal Article
Wadman, R., Durkin, K., & Conti-Ramsden, G. (2008). Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI). Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 51, doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/069)

Purpose: To determine if lower global self-esteem, shyness and low sociability are outcomes associated with SLI in adolescence. Possible concurrent predictive relationships and gender differences were also examined. Method: Fifty-four adolescents wit... Read More about Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI).

Decomposition of neural circuits of human attention using a model based analysis: sSoTs model application to fMRI data (2008)
Journal Article
Mavritsaki, E., Allen, H. A., & Humphreys, G. W. (2008). Decomposition of neural circuits of human attention using a model based analysis: sSoTs model application to fMRI data. doi:10.1142/9789812834232_0033

The complex neural circuits found in fMRI studies of human attention were decomposed using a model of spiking neurons. The model for visual search over time and space (sSoTS) incorporates different synaptic components (NMDA, AMPA, GABA) and a frequen... Read More about Decomposition of neural circuits of human attention using a model based analysis: sSoTs model application to fMRI data.

Previewing distracters reduces their effective contrast (2007)
Journal Article
Allen, H. A., & Humphreys, G. W. (2007). Previewing distracters reduces their effective contrast. Vision Research, 47(23), doi:10.1016/j.visres.2007.07.019

In a visual search task, when half the distracters are presented earlier than the remainder (‘previewed’), observers find the target item more efficiently than when all the items are presented together—the preview benefit. We measured psychometric fu... Read More about Previewing distracters reduces their effective contrast.

A psychophysical investigation into the preview benefit in visual search (2007)
Journal Article
Allen, H. A., & Humphreys, G. W. (2007). A psychophysical investigation into the preview benefit in visual search. Vision Research, 47(6), doi:10.1016/j.visres.2006.11.007

In preview search, half of the distracters are presented ahead of the remaining distracters and the target. Search under these conditions is more efficient than when all the items appear together (Watson & Humphreys, 1997). We investigated the mechan... Read More about A psychophysical investigation into the preview benefit in visual search.

Ventral extra-striate cortical areas are required for optimal orientation averaging (2007)
Journal Article
Allen, H. A., Humphreys, G. W., & Bridge, H. (2007). Ventral extra-striate cortical areas are required for optimal orientation averaging. Vision Research, 47(6), doi:10.1016/j.visres.2006.10.018

We examined the ability of a previously well-studied patient with visual agnosia to compute the average orientation of elements in visual displays. In a structural MRI study, we show that the lesion is likely to involve a variety of ventral extra-str... Read More about Ventral extra-striate cortical areas are required for optimal orientation averaging.

Error analyses reveal contrasting deficits in “theory of mind”: neuropsychological evidence from a 3-option false belief task (2007)
Journal Article
Samson, D., Apperly, I. A., & Humphreys, G. W. (2007). Error analyses reveal contrasting deficits in “theory of mind”: neuropsychological evidence from a 3-option false belief task. Neuropsychologia, 45(11), doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.03.013

Perspective taking is a crucial ability that guides our social interactions. In this study, we show how the specific patterns of errors of brain-damaged patients in perspective taking tasks can help us further understand the factors contributing to p... Read More about Error analyses reveal contrasting deficits in “theory of mind”: neuropsychological evidence from a 3-option false belief task.

When “happy” means “sad”: neuropsychological evidence for the right prefrontal cortex contribution to executive semantic processing (2007)
Journal Article
Samson, D., Connolly, C., & Humphreys, G. W. (2007). When “happy” means “sad”: neuropsychological evidence for the right prefrontal cortex contribution to executive semantic processing. Neuropsychologia, 45(5),

The contribution of the left inferior prefrontal cortex in semantic processing has been widely investigated in the last decade. Converging evidence from functional imaging studies shows that this region is involved in the “executive” or “controlled”... Read More about When “happy” means “sad”: neuropsychological evidence for the right prefrontal cortex contribution to executive semantic processing.

Self-ordered pointing as a test of working memory in typically developing children (2007)
Journal Article
Cragg, L., & Nation, K. (2007). Self-ordered pointing as a test of working memory in typically developing children. Memory, 15(5),

The self-ordered pointing test (SOPT; Petrides & Milner, 1982) is a test of non-spatial executive working memory requiring the ability to generate and monitor a sequence of responses. Although used with developmental clinical populations there are... Read More about Self-ordered pointing as a test of working memory in typically developing children.

Examining consumer behaviour toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain (2006)
Journal Article
Spence, A., & Townsend, E. (2006). Examining consumer behaviour toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain. Risk Analysis, 26(3), doi:10.1111/j.1539-6924.2006.00777.x

This study examined behaviour towards genetically modified (GM) food in a British community-based sample. We used an equivalent gain task in which participants actually received the options they chose to encourage truthful responding. In conjunction... Read More about Examining consumer behaviour toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain.

Implicit attitudes towards Genetically Modified (GM) foods: a comparison of context-free and context-dependent evaluations (2006)
Journal Article
Spence, A., & Townsend, E. (2006). Implicit attitudes towards Genetically Modified (GM) foods: a comparison of context-free and context-dependent evaluations. Appetite, 46(2), doi:10.1016/j.appet.2005.09.003

Past research on attitudes towards GM food has focused on measuring explicit attitudes. Here we compared implicit attitudes towards GM foods with explicit attitudes towards GM foods. We used the Go No-Go task to investigate context-free implicit eval... Read More about Implicit attitudes towards Genetically Modified (GM) foods: a comparison of context-free and context-dependent evaluations.

There’s no place like home: cage odours and place preference in subordinate CD-1 male mice (2006)
Journal Article
Fitchett, A. E., Barnard, C. J., & Cassaday, H. J. (2006). There’s no place like home: cage odours and place preference in subordinate CD-1 male mice. Physiology and Behavior, 87(5), doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.02.010

Prior studies using mice have shown that scent marks are an important source of information and can cause behavioural changes in other individuals. Studies have also shown that scent marks in the environment can affect the outcome of social interacti... Read More about There’s no place like home: cage odours and place preference in subordinate CD-1 male mice.

Seeing it my way: a case of a selective deficit in inhibiting self-perspective (2005)
Journal Article
Samson, D., Apperly, I. A., Kathirgamanathan, U., & Humphreys, G. W. (2005). Seeing it my way: a case of a selective deficit in inhibiting self-perspective. Brain, 128(5), doi:10.1093/brain/awh464

Little is known about the functional and neural architecture of social reasoning, one major obstacle being that we crucially lack the relevant tools to test potentially different social reasoning components. In the case of belief reasoning, previous... Read More about Seeing it my way: a case of a selective deficit in inhibiting self-perspective.

Poor encoding of position by contrast-defined motion (2004)
Journal Article
Allen, H. A., Ledgeway, T., & Hess, R. F. (2004). Poor encoding of position by contrast-defined motion. Vision Research, 44(17), doi:10.1016/j.visres.2004.03.025

Second-order (contrast-defined) motion stimuli lead to poor performance on a number of tasks, including discriminating form from motion and visual search. To investigate this deficiency, we tested the ability of human observers to monitor multiple re... Read More about Poor encoding of position by contrast-defined motion.

Visual mechanisms of motion analysis and motion perception (2003)
Journal Article
Derrington, A., Allen, H. A., & Delicato, L. (2003). Visual mechanisms of motion analysis and motion perception. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.55.090902.141903

Psychophysical experiments on feature tracking suggest that most of our sensitivity to chromatic motion and to second-order motion depends on feature tracking. There is no reason to suppose that the visual system contains motion sensors dedicated to... Read More about Visual mechanisms of motion analysis and motion perception.

Caregiver strain in spouses of stroke patients (2003)
Journal Article
Blake, H., Lincoln, N. B., & Clarke, D. D. (2003). Caregiver strain in spouses of stroke patients. Clinical Rehabilitation, 17(3), 312-317. doi:10.1191/0269215503cr613oa

Objective: To test the ability of a previously generated logistic regression model to predict caregiver strain from carer mood, negative affectivity and perceived patient functional ability. Design: Postal prospective survey. Setting: Spouses o... Read More about Caregiver strain in spouses of stroke patients.