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The effect of accent exposure on children’s sociolinguistic evaluation of peers (2019)
Journal Article
Paquette-Smith, M., Buckler, H., White, K., Choi, J., & Johnson, E. K. (2019). The effect of accent exposure on children’s sociolinguistic evaluation of peers. Developmental Psychology, doi:10.1037/dev0000659

Language and accent strongly influence the formation of social groups. By five years of age, children already show strong social preferences for peers who speak their native language with a familiar accent (Kinzler, Shutts, DeJesus, & Spelke, 2009).... Read More

What infant-directed speech tells us about the development of compensation for assimilation (2017)
Journal Article
Buckler, H., Goy, H., & Johnson, E. K. (2018). What infant-directed speech tells us about the development of compensation for assimilation. Journal of Phonetics, 66, doi:10.1016/j.wocn.2017.09.004. ISSN 0095-4470

In speech addressed to adults, words are seldom realized in their canonical, or citation, form. For example, the word ‘green’ in the phrase ‘green beans’ can often be realized as ‘greem’ due to English place assimilation, where word-final coronals ta... Read More

Input matters: speed of word recognition in 2-year-olds exposed to multiple accents (2017)
Journal Article
Buckler, H., Oczak-Arsik, S., Siddiqui, N., & Johnson, E. K. (in press). Input matters: speed of word recognition in 2-year-olds exposed to multiple accents. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 164, doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2017.06.017. ISSN 0022-0965

Although studies investigating language abilities in young children exposed to more than one language have become common, there is still surprisingly little research examining language development in children exposed to more than one accent. Here, we... Read More

Using distributional statistics to acquire morphophonological alternations: evidence from production and perception (2016)
Journal Article
Buckler, H., & Fikkert, P. (2016). Using distributional statistics to acquire morphophonological alternations: evidence from production and perception. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00540. ISSN 1664-1078

Morphophonological alternations, such as the voicing alternation that arises in a morphological paradigm due to final-devoicing in Dutch, are notoriously difficult for children to acquire. This has previously been attributed to their unpredictability... Read More

Dutch and German 3-year-olds’ representations of voicing alternations (2015)
Journal Article
Buckler, H., & Fikkert, P. (in press). Dutch and German 3-year-olds’ representations of voicing alternations. Language and Speech, 59(2), doi:10.1177/0023830915587038. ISSN 0023-8309

The voicing contrast is neutralised syllable and word finally in Dutch and German, leading to alternations within the morphological paradigm (e.g. Dutch ‘bed(s)’, be[t] be[d]en, German ‘dog(s)’, Hun[t]-Hun[d]e). Despite structural similarity, languag... Read More