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‘For We Shall Prejudice Nothing’: Middle Way Conservatism and the Defence of Inequality, 1945–1979

Blackburn, Dean

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Abstract

Recent descriptions of British Conservatism have often identified the defence of inequality as one of its core ideological features. By drawing upon Michael Freeden's morphological conception of ideologies, this article will challenge such descriptions. Drawing upon the discourses of a particular formation of post-war Conservative thought, it will suggest that because Conservatives adhered to a particular set of epistemological and ontological beliefs, the defence of inequality could only obtain a subordinate status within their thought. And it will, in turn, critique dominant understandings of post-war party competition.

Citation

Blackburn, D. (2016). ‘For We Shall Prejudice Nothing’: Middle Way Conservatism and the Defence of Inequality, 1945–1979. Political Studies, 64(1_suppl), 156-172. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9248.12210

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jan 10, 2015
Online Publication Date May 11, 2015
Publication Date 2016-04
Deposit Date Jan 4, 2017
Publicly Available Date Jan 4, 2017
Journal Political Studies
Print ISSN 0032-3217
Electronic ISSN 1467-9248
Publisher SAGE Publications
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 64
Issue 1_suppl
Pages 156-172
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9248.12210
Keywords Conservatism; Conservative Party; post-war Britain
Public URL http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/30981
Publisher URL http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-9248.12210
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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