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Genetic diversity of porcine group A rotavirus strains in the UK

Chandler-Bostock, Rebecca; Hancox, Laura R.; Nawaz, Sameena; Watts, Oliver; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Mellits, Kenneth M.

Authors

Rebecca Chandler-Bostock

Laura R. Hancox

Sameena Nawaz

Oliver Watts

Miren Iturriza-Gomara



Abstract

Rotavirus is endemic in pig farms where it causes a loss in production. This study is the first to characterise porcine rotavirus circulating in UK pigs. Samples from diarrheic pigs with rotavirus enteritis obtained between 2010 and 2012 were genotyped in order to determine the diversity of group A rotavirus (GARV) in UK pigs. A wide range of rotavirus genotypes were identified in UK pigs: six G types (VP7); G2, G3, G4, G5, G9 and G11 and six P types (VP4); P[6], P[7], P[8], P[13], P[23], and P[32]. With the exception of a single P[8] isolate, there was less than 95% nucleotide identity between sequences from this study and any available rotavirus sequences.

The G9 and P[6] genotypes are capable of infecting both humans and pigs, but showed no species cross-over within the UK as they were shown to be genetically distinct, which suggested zoonotic transmission is rare within the UK. We identified the P[8] genotype in one isolate, this genotype is almost exclusively found in humans. The P[8] was linked to a human Irish rotavirus isolate in the same year. The discovery of human genotype P[8] rotavirus in a UK pig confirms this common human genotype can infect pigs and also highlights the necessity of surveillance of porcine rotavirus genotypes to safeguard human as well as porcine health.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Sep 17, 2014
Journal Veterinary Microbiology
Print ISSN 0378-1135
Electronic ISSN 1873-2542
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 173
Issue 1-2
APA6 Citation Chandler-Bostock, R., Hancox, L. R., Nawaz, S., Watts, O., Iturriza-Gomara, M., & Mellits, K. M. (2014). Genetic diversity of porcine group A rotavirus strains in the UK. Veterinary Microbiology, 173(1-2), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.06.030
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.06.030
Keywords Rotavirus; Porcine; Phylogenetic; Zoonosis
Publisher URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378113514003228
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0





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