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Infant temperament and childhood psychiatric disorder: longitudinal study

Sayal Heron, K.; Heron, J.; Maughan, B.; Rowe, R.; Ramchandani, P.

Authors

K. Sayal Heron kapil.sayal@nottingham.ac.uk

J. Heron

B. Maughan

R. Rowe

P. Ramchandani

Abstract

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Temperamental characteristics emerge early in life and can shape children's development, adjustment and behaviour. We aimed to investigate the association between early infant temperament and later childhood psychiatric disorder in a community sample.
METHODS:
This prospective, population-based study used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In a sample of 7318 children, we investigated whether temperamental characteristics assessed at the ages of 6 months and 24 months are associated with an independent diagnosis of psychiatric disorder ascertained at age 7 years.
RESULTS:
After adjusting for confounders, temperamental characteristics assessed at 6 and 24 months of age were associated with psychiatric disorder at age 7 years. In particular, intensity of emotional reaction at age 6 months was associated with later disorder (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval 1.19, 2.04; P = 0.002). These associations were stronger in girls and in those children with high levels of intensity at both 6 and 24 months of age.
CONCLUSIONS:
Temperamental characteristics involving high levels of emotional intensity within the first year of life are longitudinally associated with psychiatric disorder in mid-childhood, suggesting that the roots of psychiatric disorder may, in some cases, lie very early in life.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Apr 3, 2013
Journal Child: Care, Health and Development
Print ISSN 0305-1862
Electronic ISSN 0305-1862
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 40
Issue 2
Institution Citation Sayal Heron, K., Heron, J., Maughan, B., Rowe, R., & Ramchandani, P. (2013). Infant temperament and childhood psychiatric disorder: longitudinal study. Child: Care, Health and Development, 40(2), doi:10.1111/cch.12054
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/cch.12054
Publisher URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cch.12054/abstract
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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