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Archaeal genetics – the third way

Allers, Thorsten; Mevarech, Moshe

Authors

Thorsten Allers thorsten.allers@nottingham.ac.uk

Moshe Mevarech



Abstract

For decades, archaea were misclassified as bacteria on account of their prokaryotic morphology. Molecular phylogeny eventually revealed that archaea, like bacteria and eukaryotes, are a fundamentally distinct domain of life. Genome analyses have confirmed that archaea share many features with eukaryotes, particularly in information processing, and therefore can serve as streamlined models for understanding eukaryotic biology. Biochemists and structural biologists have embraced the study of archaea but geneticists have been more wary, despite the fact that genetic techniques for archaea are quite sophisticated. It is high time for geneticists to start asking fundamental questions about our distant relatives.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jan 1, 2005
Journal Nature Genetics
Print ISSN 1061-4036
Electronic ISSN 1546-1718
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 6
APA6 Citation Allers, T., & Mevarech, M. (2005). Archaeal genetics – the third way. Nature Genetics, 6, doi:10.1038/nrg1504
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/nrg1504
Publisher URL https://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/v6/n1/full/nrg1504.html
Copyright Statement Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingh.../end_user_agreement.pdf

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Copyright Statement
Copyright information regarding this work can be found at the following address: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/end_user_agreement.pdf





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