Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Using an objective computer task (QbTest) to aid the identification of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Children and Young People Secure Estate (CYPSE): a feasibility randomised controlled trial

Chitsabesan, Prathiba; Hall, Charlotte Lucy; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Reeves, Mindy; Mohammed, Vaseem; Beresford, Bryony; Young, Susan; Kraam, Abdullah; Trwose, Sally; Wilkinson-Cunningham, Lloyd; Lennox, Charlotte

Using an objective computer task (QbTest) to aid the identification of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Children and Young People Secure Estate (CYPSE): a feasibility randomised controlled trial Thumbnail


Authors

Prathiba Chitsabesan

Lesley-Anne Carter

Mindy Reeves

Vaseem Mohammed

Bryony Beresford

Susan Young

Abdullah Kraam

Sally Trwose

Lloyd Wilkinson-Cunningham

Charlotte Lennox



Abstract

Objectives:

QbTest has been shown to improve time to decision/diagnosis for young people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aim was to assess feasibility of QbTest for young people in prison.

Design:

Single centre feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT), with 1:1 allocation. Concealed random allocation using an online pseudo-random list with random permuted blocks of varying sizes.
Setting: One Young Offenders Institution (YOI) in England.

Participants:

355 young people aged 15-18 years displaying possible symptoms of ADHD were assessed for eligibility, 69 were eligible to take part and 60 were randomised.

Intervention:

QbTest - a computer task measuring attention, activity, and impulsivity.

Main outcome measures:

Eligibility, recruitment and retention rates and acceptability of randomisation and trial participation.

Results:

Of the 355 young people assessed for eligibility, 69 were eligible, and 60 were randomised (n = 30 QbTest plus usual care; n = 30 usual care alone). The study achieved the specified recruitment target. Trial participation and randomisation were deemed acceptable by the majority of participants. 78% of young people were followed up at 3-months, but only 32% at 6-months, although this was also affected by COVID restrictions. Secondary outcomes were mixed. Participants including clinical staff were mostly supportive of the study and QbTest, however some young people found QbTest hard and there were issues with implementation of the ADHD care pathway. There were no serious adverse events secondary to the study or intervention and no one was withdrawn from the study due to an adverse event.

Conclusions:

With adaptations, a fully powered RCT may be achievable to evaluate the effectiveness of QbTest in the assessment of ADHD in the CYPSE, with time to decision (days) as the primary outcome measure. However, further programme developmental work is required to address some of the challenges highlighted prior to a larger trial.

Citation

Chitsabesan, P., Hall, C. L., Carter, L., Reeves, M., Mohammed, V., Beresford, B., …Lennox, C. (2022). Using an objective computer task (QbTest) to aid the identification of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Children and Young People Secure Estate (CYPSE): a feasibility randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 12(12), Article e064951. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2022-064951

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Nov 25, 2022
Online Publication Date Dec 16, 2022
Publication Date Dec 16, 2022
Deposit Date Nov 28, 2022
Publicly Available Date Dec 16, 2022
Journal BMJ Open
Electronic ISSN 2044-6055
Publisher BMJ
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 12
Issue 12
Article Number e064951
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2022-064951
Keywords General Medicine
Public URL https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/14307149
Publisher URL https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/12/12/e064951
Additional Information © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY.